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SAS Australia ‘was The Sam Burgess Show from day one’ sources claim

A source exclusively revealed to Daily Mail Australia last week that one recruit on this year’s SAS Australia was given preferential treatment all season long.

And now another source has come forward with claims that the Channel Seven series ‘was always The Sam Burgess Show from day one.’

Speaking to The Daily Telegraph on Sunday, an insider alleged that producers ‘had the Sam Burgess redemption story narrative in their heads’ from day one. 

Favourite son: An SAS Australia source has come forward to confirm that the Channel Seven reality TV series ‘was always The Sam Burgess Show from day one’. Pictured: Sam Burgess

Further, other contestants on series were reportedly miffed after they found out that  the former South Sydney Rabbitohs star, 32, was getting more air time than them. 

Another explosive claim was that Burgess, who was forced to retire from the NRL with a chronic shoulder injury, wasn’t actually able to complete the final rope hang challenge.

Rather, they suggested that the footage was edited to make it look like Sam endured the full 90 seconds. 

Plotted: The source alleged to The Daily Telegraph on Sunday that producers 'had the Sam Burgess redemption story narrative in their heads' from the beginning

Plotted: The source alleged to The Daily Telegraph on Sunday that producers ‘had the Sam Burgess redemption story narrative in their heads’ from the beginning 

Daily Mail Australia has reached out to the Seven Network for comment. 

Sam was the only celebrity recruit to pass final selection during Tuesday’s SAS Australia finale.

After taking some time to deliberate, the show’s DS (directing staff) ultimately decided that only Sam had what it took to make it as an SAS soldier.

Final judges: After taking some time to deliberate, the show's DS (directing staff) ultimately decided that only Sam had what it took to make it as an SAS soldier. Pictured: Ant Middleton (left) and Mark 'Billy' Billingham

Final judges: After taking some time to deliberate, the show’s DS (directing staff) ultimately decided that only Sam had what it took to make it as an SAS soldier. Pictured: Ant Middleton (left) and Mark ‘Billy’ Billingham

Ant Middleton admitted it had been ‘a hard decision to make’, before the DS stepped before the recruits and delivered their final verdict.

‘We’re not looking for brawn, we’re not looking for brain, we’re looking for a combination of both,’ Ant told the recruits.

‘You can take in information, divulge it and execute what needs to be done. Teamwork, leadership, everything.’ 

Finale: Sam was the only celebrity recruit to pass final selection during Tuesday's SAS Australia finale

Finale: Sam was the only celebrity recruit to pass final selection during Tuesday’s SAS Australia finale

After revealing John, 39, and Mark hadn’t passed, Ant turned to Sam and told him: ‘You have successfully passed this course. Well done.’

In the often unreal world of reality television, SAS Australia is supposed to be as ‘real’ as it gets.

For eight weeks now, Australians followed the trials of the 18 celebrity recruits relying solely on their mental and physical toughness to survive the military-style selection course – or so we’re led to believe.

But Daily Mail Australia last week revealed that for all its talk about ‘not being a game’, SAS Australia is no different to every other reality show on television.

Unreal: Daily Mail Australia last week revealed that for all its talk about 'not being a game', SAS Australia is no different to every other reality show on television

Unreal: Daily Mail Australia last week revealed that for all its talk about ‘not being a game’, SAS Australia is no different to every other reality show on television

Production sources claim the final five recruits were each given fictional ‘cover stories’ for the last episode to study and memorise.

Even though these stories weren’t true, they had to commit to them even under fierce interrogation by the directing staff (DS).

Dan Ewing, John Steffensen, Jana Pittman, Mark Philippoussis and Sam Burgess all delivered their scripted lines, but only Ewing was called out for fabricating a story.

This resulted in him being sent home from the competition.

Ewing was apparently never destined to make the top four, with producers determined to kick him off the show before the finale.

Twisted game: The final five recruits were each given fictional 'cover stories' for the finale to study and memorise. Even though these stories weren't true, they had to commit to them under interrogation - only for Dan Ewing (pictured) to be called a liar while the others got off scot-free

Frontrunner: Former NRL star Sam Burgess was one of the final five recruits on SAS Australia

Twisted game: The final five recruits were each given fictional ‘cover stories’ for the finale to study and memorise. Even though these stories weren’t true, they had to commit to them under interrogation – only for Dan Ewing to be called a liar while the others got off scot-free

Ewing and Pittman were the only two recruits who managed to successfully commit the cover story to memory – which is no surprise given Ewing learns lines for a living. 

But during his interrogation, Ewing was accused of making up the story he’d been given by producers, and chief instructor Ant Middleton tore strips off him. 

The former British solider chose once again to paint Ewing as an ‘off-with-the fairies’ actor rather than acknowledging his perfect recall of the cover story.

Unfair: During his interrogation, Ewing was accused of making up the story he'd been given by producers, and chief instructor Ant tore strips off him. Middleton chose to paint Ewing as an 'off-with-the fairies' actor rather than acknowledging his perfect recall

Unfair: During his interrogation, Ewing was accused of making up the story he’d been given by producers, and chief instructor Ant tore strips off him. Middleton chose to paint Ewing as an ‘off-with-the fairies’ actor rather than acknowledging his perfect recall

‘Dan recited the cover story perfectly, yet got ripped a new one. They were trying to suggest he made up this cover story when it was the cover story he’d been given as part of the challenge,’ said a source.

The whole set-up of the challenge apparently won’t be featured in the final edit, so the episode will make it look like Ewing was simply lying.

‘The stitch-up begins when they edit out all reference to the “cover story” the recruits are given and told to study, which of course feeds into what happens next when Dan is sent packing after another run with Middleton,’ the insider added.

This was allegedly another calculated move by producers to keep Ewing from making it to the end of the competition – because he was a threat to the preferred winner Sam Burgess.

Stitch-up: This was another calculated move by producers to keep Ewing from making it to the end of the competition - because he was a threat to the preferred winner Burgess

Stitch-up: This was another calculated move by producers to keep Ewing from making it to the end of the competition – because he was a threat to the preferred winner Burgess

Unlike season one, which saw several recruits pass the selection course, this time there is only one recruit left standing at the end – and it’s no surprise who it is. 

‘We knew from day one one when we lined up for the promotional photos who’d be there at the end. This guy is front, row and centre in every group photo and was portrayed in glowing terms throughout the entire season,’ said one recruit. 

‘Everyone loves a story of redemption. Especially producers who are more interested in ratings than the integrity of the SAS course and the viewing public.

‘This show is a charade. It’s no different to Married At First Sight.’ 

Pick a winner: Unlike season one, which saw several recruits pass the selection course, this time there is only one recruit left standing at the end - and it's no surprise who it is

Pick a winner: Unlike season one, which saw several recruits pass the selection course, this time there is only one recruit left standing at the end – and it’s no surprise who it is

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