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Sharks circle in plume of blood as rotting whale carcass is removed from Western Australian beach

The colossal carcass of a giant whale is bringing some unwanted visitors to a popular tourist destination in Western Australia.

Cheynes Beach, an idyllic stretch of sand known for its now-defunct whaling station, has seen its fair share of the dead mammals over the years.

But the rotting remains of a massive 23 metre fin whale has made a big splash in the area, it seems, as legions of sharks were spotted prowling the blood-stained waters on Monday.

The rotting remains of a massive 23 metre fin whale have attracted legions of sharks to Cheynes Beach in Western Australia (pictured)

It took six truckloads of decaying flesh, blubber and bone to completely remove the whale from the beachfront, with most the remains being taken to a landfill in nearby Albany

It took six truckloads of decaying flesh, blubber and bone to completely remove the whale from the beachfront, with most the remains being taken to a landfill in nearby Albany

The dead whale was first spotted on Thursday afternoon, The West Australian reports, with City of Albany rangers closing the beach due to fears that the bloated, 50-tonne mammal could attract ocean predators.

By the time it was finally dragged up onto the sand for removal on Monday, a huge slick plume of blood, oil and bodily fluids had seeped out into the turquoise waters – and the sharks were circling.

Local wildlife photographer Raeline Smith managed to capture some incredible images of the moment the blood-hungry menaces arrived on the scene.

‘It’s attracted some very large predators,’ she said. ‘There’s some good 4 metre to 5 metre whites out there.’

By the time it was finally removed a huge slick plume of blood, oil and bodily fluids had seeped out into the turquoise waters - and the sharks were circling

By the time it was finally removed a huge slick plume of blood, oil and bodily fluids had seeped out into the turquoise waters – and the sharks were circling

Cheynes Beach is an idyllic stretch of sand along the Western Australian coast - a popular tourist destination that is well-known for its now-defunct whaling station

Cheynes Beach is an idyllic stretch of sand along the Western Australian coast – a popular tourist destination that is well-known for its now-defunct whaling station

It took six truckloads of decaying flesh, blubber and bone to completely remove the whale from the beachfront, with most the remains being taken to a landfill in nearby Albany.

‘You don’t want to get downwind of it, that’s for sure,’ said Ms Smith. 

Two great white sharks were tagged and released near the beach on Tuesday.

They measured between three and four metres in length.

Fin whales, the second-largest mammal on Earth, are currently listed as an endangered species

Fin whales, the second-largest mammal on Earth, are currently listed as an endangered species

A total of 1136 humpbacks and 14,695 sperm whales were caught from the Cheynes Beach Whaling Station between 1952 and 1978. 

Fin whales, the second-largest mammal on Earth, are currently listed as an endangered species.



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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