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Strictly Come Dancing crew ‘fear that their hot studio could cause a coronavirus outbreak’

Strictly Come Dancing crew ‘fear that their hot studio could cause a coronavirus outbreak’ when new series starts filming

Soaring temperatures in the UK and the coronavirus outbreak have presented new challenges for work environments. 

And Strictly Come Dancing bosses are apparently concerned that their hot studios could increase the contagion of the virus when filming begins.

The BBC dancing contest was already hit with a series of delays due to the outbreak and subsequent restrictions. 

Corona fear: Strictly Come Dancing bosses are apparently concerned that their hot studios could increase the contagion of the virus when filming begins

According to The Sun, the BBC One competition will only able to be aired if they are able to keep the studio temperature below 21 degrees.  

On Monday, the weather started to cool as the UK experienced rain and thunderstorms.

However the health and safety crew apparently fear that if we experience another heatwave like the beginning of August, the increased amount of sweat from dancers could significantly increase the likelihood of catching coronavirus on set. 

A Strictly source discussed the show’s challenges with The Sun, explaining:  ‘Producers and crew are jumping through all sorts of hoops to get the show on the air for viewers. 

‘The latest hurdle is keeping it cool enough that everyone isn’t a big, sweaty mess. 

Heatwave: The health and safety crew for the dancing competition are said to be 'jumping through hoops' to ensure temperatures don't rise on set and result in them cancelling the show

Heatwave: The health and safety crew for the dancing competition are said to be ‘jumping through hoops’ to ensure temperatures don’t rise on set and result in them cancelling the show

Despite their best efforts, the lighting and electrical equipment used on set makes it increasingly difficult to control rising temperatures.

And combined with the energetic and physically demanding dance routines, it makes it harder for the team to cool contestants down and subsequently decrease the risk of an outbreak. 

They added: ‘The theory is that the more the dancers and celebs sweat, the greater the risk of Covid infection potentially. 

‘So they’re trying to keep it cool, which is very difficult under the red-hot studio lights.’

It is unclear what testing the TV show are doing to ensure no cast or crew bring coronavirus to the set.

However, the BBC production will undoubtedly have to comply with strict protocol and protective measures, and are likely doing whatever it takes to ensure the safety of all parties involved.

Perspiration: The lighting and electrical equipment for the set combined with the rigorous exercise from contestants in the heat is creating a 'sweaty mess' challenge for the crew

Perspiration: The lighting and electrical equipment for the set combined with the rigorous exercise from contestants in the heat is creating a ‘sweaty mess’ challenge for the crew

Earlier this month it was reported that show executives are ‘devising 100 different formats’ to align with current guidelines as filming prepares to take place in Elstree Studios for a start date of October 24.

The restrictions include putting a limit on the amount of people allowed on set, as well as excluding ‘chemistry circles’ in auditions, which sees contestants alternate in ‘sexy’ dances with professionals so producers can decide ‘who look good together’.

A BBC source told The Sun: ‘Preparing for this year’s show is a huge headache. The goalposts keep moving, so the big decisions are being left to the last minute so we’re as up to date as possible.

‘But any concrete things we can decide on now, we are doing. Making one hit series is hard enough. As things stand, we are having to plan for hundreds. The slightest change to the rules could have a massive impact on how the show is filmed. Many [celebs] are weighing up their options, so Strictly still doesn’t have a full line-up.’

The insider claimed the competition will be held in a near-empty, no-audience studio with a scaled-back crew consisting of only 25 per cent of the usual team for the first time in the show’s 16-year history.

The stars, as well as judges Motsi Mabuse, Shirley Ballas, Craig Revel Horwood and Bruno Tonioli – if he manages to return from filming Dancing With The Stars in the US in time, will reportedly not be permitted to bring their loved ones, agents, or beauty experts to the studio.

Another aspect of the series that is believed to have changed is the partnering process, which could be decided on height alone as opposed to the celebs performing salsa dances in a circle with all ballroom experts. 

The Strictly Come Dancing bosses will have to come up with an inventive solution to control temperatures when the British heat returns while maintaining coronavirus safety protocol

The Strictly Come Dancing bosses will have to come up with an inventive solution to control temperatures when the British heat returns while maintaining coronavirus safety protocol

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk