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Stunning aerial pictures show the world’s largest cattle station as it goes on sale for $50 million

A rural Australian cattle farm the size of Fiji has hit the market for an estimated $50million.

The historic Clifton Hills Station is one of the largest rural properties in the world – crossing state borders and sprawling all the way from Queensland into South Australia.

Close to 20,000 cattle call the enormous 1.6million hectare, or 16,510 square kilometers, of outback land home.

The current owners – a partnership of multiple shareholders – have held the property for more than 60 years.

The land boasts a central homestead hub, multiple roads, airstrips, 24 sets of steel trucking yards, six flowing bores, and farming equipment.

A rural Australian cattle farm (pictured) the size of Fiji and half the size of Belgium has hit the market for an estimated $50million. Close to 20,000 cattle call the enormous 1.6million hectare, or 16,510 square kilometers, of outback land home

 The historic Clifton Hills Station  boasts a central homestead hub, multiple roads, airstrips, 24 sets of steel trucking yards, six flowing bores, and farming equipment. This makes it one of the largest rural properties in the world

 The historic Clifton Hills Station boasts a central homestead hub, multiple roads, airstrips, 24 sets of steel trucking yards, six flowing bores, and farming equipment. This makes it one of the largest rural properties in the world

The property is described as ‘the best cattle fattening country in the land’ by selling agents Colliers International Rural and Agribusiness and Rural Property and Livestock, who are running an international tender process.

It’s being sold by the Clifton Hills Pastoral Company, which ASIC records show is owned equally by David Harvey, Charles Simpson and Katherine Hartley, the AFR reported. 

A cattle farm in Beveridge, 40km north of Melbourne recently sold for hundreds of millions of dollars to a Chinese development tycoon as property investors set their sights on Australia’s housing expansion.

The Laffan family sold their 600-hectare Deloraine farm to Melbourne-based Zeng Xiong Lin who paid an incredible $200 million for the highly sought after cattle property, which the Laffan family have run for 54 years. 

The Clifton Hills property has an extra advantage to due ‘the large land area which allows cattle to be well spread-out,’ David Harvey explained.

The cattle station was originally established in 1878 on the Birdsville Track in the far north-east corner of South Australia. 

'The secret is the large land area which allows cattle to be well spread-out,' David Harvey of the Clifton Hills Pastoral Company explained

‘The secret is the large land area which allows cattle to be well spread-out,’ David Harvey of the Clifton Hills Pastoral Company explained

The current owners - a partnership of multiple shareholders - have held the property for more than 60 years which is being sold by the Clifton Hills Pastoral Company, owned equally by David Harvey, Charles Simpson and Katherine Hartley

The current owners – a partnership of multiple shareholders – have held the property for more than 60 years which is being sold by the Clifton Hills Pastoral Company, owned equally by David Harvey, Charles Simpson and Katherine Hartley

‘There are three distinct and equally balanced land types – Gibber plains with creeks, soft sand hill country, and inland river floodplains,’ Mr Harvey said.  

Gibber plain is highly responsive to rain growing annual herbage and soft sand hill country has excellent permanent feed sources of mainly Spinifex, Salt Bush and Blue Bush which is highly suited to seasonal winter rain and responds well from as little as an inch of rainfall.

The massive land area allows for a Pastoral Board Maximum Stock Rating of 21,500 cattle.      

The Georgina River, Cooper Creek and the Diamantina River all flow across Clifton Hills. Rainfall in their catchment areas consistently water large areas of Clifton Hills, creating some of the best cattle fattening country in the land. 

The Diamantina, which is currently in flood, consistently floods 1,500 square kilometres each year, creating some of the best cattle fattening country in the land.

‘The Diamantina River effectively terminates in a delta floodplain on Clifton Hills, giving a consistent 1,500 sq km of flood area per annum, and making it a very fertile area,’ Mr Harvey said.

The Georgina River, Cooper Creek and the Diamantina River all flow across Clifton Hills. Rainfall in their catchment areas consistently water large areas of Clifton Hills, creating some of the best cattle fattening country in the land

The Georgina River, Cooper Creek and the Diamantina River all flow across Clifton Hills. Rainfall in their catchment areas consistently water large areas of Clifton Hills, creating some of the best cattle fattening country in the land

There are three distinct and equally balanced land types ranging from gibber plain with creeks (pictured) that is highly responsive to rain growing annual herbage, soft sandhill country with excellent permanent feed sources of mainly Spinifex, Salt Bush and Blue Bush; and inland river floodplain

There are three distinct and equally balanced land types ranging from gibber plain with creeks (pictured) that is highly responsive to rain growing annual herbage, soft sandhill country with excellent permanent feed sources of mainly Spinifex, Salt Bush and Blue Bush; and inland river floodplain

‘There’s never been a better time to offer a cattle property of this calibre,’ the agents Ben Forrest, Jesse Manuel and Nick Dean Colliers have claimed.  

Strong demand from both domestic and international investors and other institutions has had a significant impact on cattle property sales over the past year.   

‘All rain that falls on the property stays on the property,’ Wally Cooper from Rural Property and Livestock explained.

‘The internal gibber country acts like an enormous roof which fills numerous creeks and swamps generating growth of fantastic feed all from an inch of rain.’

'All rain that falls on the property stays on the property,' Wally Cooper from Rural Property and Livestock explained. 'The internal gibber country acts like an enormous roof which fills numerous creeks and swamps generating growth of fantastic feed all from an inch of rain'

‘All rain that falls on the property stays on the property,’ Wally Cooper from Rural Property and Livestock explained. ‘The internal gibber country acts like an enormous roof which fills numerous creeks and swamps generating growth of fantastic feed all from an inch of rain’

One of the property’s great advantages is it’s ability to be largely self-sustaining and able to maintain a core herd during periods of drought.

The Birdsville Track crosses the property over four pastoral leases, giving access to both northern and southern markets. 

‘The property has very good scale, with a 21,500 head of stock rating on the pastoral lease. The scale on Clifton Hills is achieved without massive infrastructure – the secret is the large land area which allows cattle to be well spread-out,’ Mr Cooper said. 

For these reasons, selling agent Ben Forrest believes Clifton Hills Station will attract a premium price.

‘Clifton Hills Station offers a very appealing opportunity for investors to acquire a substantial herd without the costs associated with freight, and the complexities involved in purchasing new stock,’ he said.

The agents anticipate interest from $1,550 per beast area, based on the present pastoral board maximum of 21,500 cattle, plus cattle.  

Expressions of interest in the international tender process are currently invited and consortium is offering the whole enterprise on a walk-in, walk-out basis.



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