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Texas residents pitch tents on their roof awaiting rescue

People stranded in their Houston homes during Hurricane Harvey pitched tents on their roofs as they waited to be rescued from floodwaters.

Williamson County Sheriff Robert Chody tweeted a photo on Monday showing a home in the southeast Houston suburb of Dickinson, where floodwater had risen more than halfway up the front door.

The home’s residents pitched tents on their roof in an attempt to get to higher ground as they waited to be rescued.

Williamson County Sheriff Robert Chody tweeted a photo on Monday showing a home in Dickinson, Texas, where residents pitched tents on their roof after floodwater surrounded their home

Another photo of the same house shows the preparations that were taken before Harvey hit

Another photo of the same house shows the floodwater had drained, but the tents were still pitched, with belongings and screen windows strewn across the lawn

A ladder can be seen leading to the roof in the photo as what appear to be the owner’s belongings floating in front of the home.

‘The total loss of our team is seeing is indescribable. Pitching tents on roof,’ Chody tweeted on Tuesday.

‘The image of tent on roof is not in Williamson County but in Houston, just to be clear taken from my deputies in Houston’ Chody later tweeted.

A later photo of the same house shows the floodwater had drained, but the tents were still pitched, with belongings and screen windows strewn across the lawn.

Chody’s department from Williamson, north of Austin, have been aiding rescue efforts since Hurricane Harvey hit East Texas last week.

Early calculations on how many houses could have been affected by flooding due to Hurricane and Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston point to between 30,000 and 40,000 homes, the chief administrator of Harris County said on Wednesday.

At least 30 people have been confirmed dead but that number is likely to rocket as the waters recede and emergency services begin recovering victims once the rain stops

At least 30 people have been confirmed dead but that number is likely to rocket as the waters recede and emergency services begin recovering victims once the rain stops

‘It could be more, we just don’t know for sure until we get into these neighborhoods,’ Judge Ed Emmett said in an televised interview.

Even though some houses are ‘irreparable’, Emmett said large donations are being received and volunteers are helping as much as they can.

‘We get some very difficult months and perhaps years ahead,’ he said.

After torrential rains hit Houston for five days since last week, water is now affecting other Texas and Louisiana counties.

‘Harris County in Houston got a lot of attention because it’s a big city and a big market, but the counties around us have suffered as much as we have,’ he said.

At least 30 people have been confirmed dead but that number is likely to rocket as the waters recede and emergency services begin recovering victims once the rain stops.

Early calculations on how many houses could have been affected by flooding due to Hurricane and Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston point to between 30,000 and 40,000 homes

Early calculations on how many houses could have been affected by flooding due to Hurricane and Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston point to between 30,000 and 40,000 homes

On Tuesday, Houston’s Police Chief Art Acevedo painted a grave picture of the devastation.

‘I’m worried about how many bodies we’re going to find. I’m just hoping we find the bodies,’ he said as his officers continued to focus their efforts on saving their living rather than recovering the bodies of the dead.

Harvey made landfall in Texas on Friday and ravaged the southeast coast before moving back off shore where it has thundered on for days.

It is expected to make landfall again on Wednesday, bringing 10 inches of rain to Louisiana where preparations have been underway for days in anticipation of the deadly storm.

As rescue teams and volunteers continue rescuing stranded residents from the waters

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk