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The surprising reason young drivers die in greater numbers than their older counterparts

The surprising reason young drivers die in greater numbers than their older counterparts – and it’s NOT inexperience or alcohol

  • Young people blamed for recklessly driving on the roads and getting in crashes
  • Majority of young people in fatal accidents are driving old and unsafe cars
  • Up to 80 per cent of drivers under 20 were behind the wheel of a 20-year-old car 

Young people are often blamed for recklessly driving on the roads, but a new study has revealed it’s not their risk-taking behaviour that gets them into trouble. 

The majority of people involved in fatal accidents on Australia’s roads are under 20 years of age, and it all comes down to driving unsafe cars.

While many believe it could be inexperience, driving under the influence or trying to impress their friends – many young drivers who crash are driving cars that are 10-15 years old.

Young people are often blamed for recklessly driving on the roads, but a new study has revealed it’s not their risk-taking behaviour that gets them into trouble (stock image)

According to The Daily Telegraph, up to 80 per cent of drivers under 20-years-old who died in a car accident were behind the wheel of a car more than 10 years old.

In addition to this, 70 per cent of those who were seriously injured in crashes were also in cars more than 10 years old.

Almost 50 per cent of young people who died while driving were in cars at least 15 years old.

This means the rate of crashes with older vehicles is four times higher than newer cars built with more safety features.

Cars built between 2012 and 2017 have only been involved in 12 per cent of crashes.

The majority of people who get into fatal accidents on Australia's roads are under 20 years of age, and it all comes down to driving unsafe cars (stock image)

The majority of people who get into fatal accidents on Australia’s roads are under 20 years of age, and it all comes down to driving unsafe cars (stock image)

While many believe it could be inexperience, driving under the influence or trying to impress their friends - many young drivers who end up in a crash are in cars that are 10-15 years old

While many believe it could be inexperience, driving under the influence or trying to impress their friends – many young drivers who end up in a crash are in cars that are 10-15 years old

FATAL ACCIDENTS CAUSED BY OLD CARS 

80 per cent of drivers under 20 who died in a car accident were in a car more than 10 years old.

70 per cent of those who were seriously injured in crashes were also in cars more than 10 years old.

Almost 50 per cent of young people who died while driving were in cars at least 15 years old.

Cars built between 2012 and 2017 have only been involved in 12 per cent of crashes.

The rate of crashes with older vehicles is four times higher than newer cars. 

Average age of cars driven on Australian roads is 9.8 years.

Average age of vehicles involved in fatal accidents rose from 12.5 years in 2015 to 13.1 years in 2017. 

Data from the most recent census revealed the average age of cars being driven on Australian roads is 9.8 years.

The data also revealed the average age of vehicles involved in fatal accidents rose from 12.5 years in 2015 to 13.1 years in 2017.

Head of independent crash test authority ANCAP James Goodwin said although people think older cars are safer, it isn’t the case.

‘Of course, not everyone can afford a brand-new car, however the figures show that there is less chance of being killed in a newer and safer car than an older and less safe vehicle,’ Mr Goodwin said. 

‘Motorists should buy the safest car they can afford and the one that suits their needs.’ 

Although professionals advise to buy the safest car possible, young people are often keen to get on the road no matter the consequence.

Car dealer in Western Sydney Craig Moore said lots of young people ask whether they’ll look cool in the car. 

‘The parents will do their research, pick out a safe car, and then the kid comes to look at it on the weekend and says ‘I’m not driving that’. They’re more interested in image,’ Mr Moore said. 

70 per cent of those who were seriously injured in crashes were also in cars more than 10 years old (stock image)

70 per cent of those who were seriously injured in crashes were also in cars more than 10 years old (stock image)

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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