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‘There’s so many fake people on there’: Marcus Rashford calls social media ‘a cloud of negativity’

Marcus Rashford has called social media ‘a cloud of negativity’ and admitted he tries to avoid using it.

The footballer, 23, boasts 10million followers on Instagram but thinks young children should probably steer clear of it and other platforms until they’re older.

Marcus appeared on Monday’s episode of Lorraine where he was interviewed by former Love Island star Dr Alex George while in his old primary school Button Lane Primary School in Manchester. 

Opinion: Marcus Rashford has called social media ‘a cloud of negativity’ and admitted he tries to avoid using it

He said: ‘Everyone is different and everyone’s journey to success is different. I don’t really agree with kids being on social media 24/7, there’s so many fake people on there it’s ridiculous. 

‘I’m 23 and I don’t use it in that way. I use it to promote positive changes, other than that I don’t go on it, it’s like a cloud of negativity.’

Marcus also spoke about having role models, saying he wanted to be just like Wayne Rooney as a kid. 

Alex asked him: ‘Is it important to have someone to look up to?’ 

Marcus replied: ‘I always wanted to be like Wayne Rooney and then it got to 13, 14 and was like, is there much point in being Wayne Rooney number two?’ 

Interview: The footballer, 23, boasts 10million followers on Instagram but thinks young children should probably steer clear of it and other platforms until they're older

Interview: The footballer, 23, boasts 10million followers on Instagram but thinks young children should probably steer clear of it and other platforms until they’re older

Candid: Marcus appeared on Monday's episode of Lorraine where he was interviewed by former Love Island star Dr Alex George while in his old primary school Button Lane Primary School in Manchester

 Candid: Marcus appeared on Monday’s episode of Lorraine where he was interviewed by former Love Island star Dr Alex George while in his old primary school Button Lane Primary School in Manchester

‘So I think bringing your own personality and your own characteristics is a massive thing, but to have a role model to guide you is just as important.’

Dr Alex said: ‘I’ve been a huge fan of your work and what you’ve done with the Child Food Poverty campaign has been incredible. 

‘Must’ve been tough at times, but you’ve got to be proud of what you’ve achieved.’

To which Marcus responded: ‘The biggest thing that I’m proud of is the way that people’s local communities have just started to do things off their own backs, to try and help people in their local area, regardless of me saying anything or doing anything. To me, that’s what makes me happy and that’s what makes me smile.’

Marcus said: 'Everyone is different and everyone's journey to success is different. I don't really agree with kids being on social media 24/7, there's so many fake people on there it's ridiculous'

Marcus said: ‘Everyone is different and everyone’s journey to success is different. I don’t really agree with kids being on social media 24/7, there’s so many fake people on there it’s ridiculous’

Asked why the campaign is so important to him, Marcus explained: ‘The main reason is because what we’re speaking about is something I went through.

‘I want to give kids the opportunity to find success coming out of similar backgrounds to where I come from.’

On what would be his dream, Marcus admitted: ‘People have youth centres, as a kid I always went to youth centres… and currently I’m building a few in my local area, and they are more lifestyle centres where you can learn to cook or do sports. 

‘Whatever it is that they want to do, I want to try and make it available for them to be able to go there for one or two hours a day and really work on something that they want to become in the future.’     

He added: 'I'm 23 and I don't use it in that way. I use it to promote positive changes, other than that I don't go on it, it's like a cloud of negativity'

He added: ‘I’m 23 and I don’t use it in that way. I use it to promote positive changes, other than that I don’t go on it, it’s like a cloud of negativity’

Commenting on how he found school, Marcus said: ‘School was great, I used to really enjoy coming to school. I try and come back here as often as I can to be honest. 

‘Mainly for the kids, because they see someone who was in their shoes and compare it to where I am now. And they start to believe that it’s possible, and sometimes a little bit of belief is all that they need.’

Moving on to discuss his children’s books, he added: ‘My mum used to try and shelter me from certain things, but it just wasn’t possible because I was always out with my friends and stuff. We experience things along our journey of being kids and that’s made us into who we are today.

‘The books, it’s to help people become comfortable with meeting obstacles. If I could change one thing about my upbringing, it would be to make sure I read more books. 

‘Because of books it’s sped up that transition of being mentally strong and having that mental toughness to go out and show the world who you are.’

Continuing to speak about his time at school, Marcus shared: ‘One of the biggest things for me was stability. 

‘I used to get my stability from school and when I was training with United. They were my only two stable things.’

Lorraine airs weekdays from 9am on ITV and on ITV Hub.

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