News, Culture & Society

Thousands of Glastonbury festival-goers complain of huge queues for water in hot temperatures

A move to ban water bottles at Glastonbury has left festival-goers complaining about having to queue for as much as an hour just to refill their reusable containers.

The organisers of the festival, which is held at Worthy Farm, in Shepton Mallet, Somerset, were praised for the move to ban the sale of plastic bottles, which was aimed at reducing the amount of plastic used by the 200,000 people who attend. 

However, as temperatures soared to 82F yesterday, thirsty revellers complained about the length of the queues, with one woman saying, ‘we need more places to get water’ as some waited an hour to fill up.

And paramedic teams from South Western Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust reported they have treated 70 patients over the past two days for a mixture of heat-related and medical cases. 

A move to ban water bottles at Glastonbury has left festival-goers complaining about having to queue for as much as an hour just to refill their reusable containers

And there are fears the queues – which were as long as an hour yesterday – could get worse today with temperatures set to remain high. 

Organisers have tripled the number of kiosks where festival-goers can refill their bottles and free water is also available at the site’s bars. 

But writing on Twitter, Alison Jones said: ‘I support the ban on selling water in plastic bottles, but we need more places to get water, you seen the queues?’

Writing on Twitter, Alison Jones said: 'I support the ban on selling water in plastic bottles, but we need more places to get water, you seen the queues?'

Writing on Twitter, Alison Jones said: ‘I support the ban on selling water in plastic bottles, but we need more places to get water, you seen the queues?’

Glastonbury’s official account responded and told her to check taps near toilets and standpipes, all of which are suitable for drinking. 

However, she then tweeted a photo of one of the queues and said: ‘And this is the shortest queue, at least 30 minute wait!’    

Ms Jones, 51, from Stourbridge in the West Midlands She later told the Telegraph:  

‘Everybody has brought containers to fill up, but all the taps you have to push down on so they take ages to fill up. 

Erica, 23, who is also at the festival, said she had had to wait for 40 minutes to fill her container. 

She added: ‘With the heat this weekend it’s really hard to get water fast if you don’t plan in advance that your water is going to run out.’ 

As temperatures soared to 28 degrees celsius yesterday, thirsty revellers complained about the length of the queues, with one woman saying, 'we need more places to get water'. Above: People queue for water at the festival at Worthy Farm, in Somerset, yesterday

As temperatures soared to 28 degrees celsius yesterday, thirsty revellers complained about the length of the queues, with one woman saying, ‘we need more places to get water’. Above: People queue for water at the festival at Worthy Farm, in Somerset, yesterday

Anna Hedges, Glastonbury’s special events manager, defended their water preparations. 

She told the Telegraph: ‘WaterAid is running 37 water kiosks in 33 locations across the Glastonbury Festival site, as well as looking after 20 six-tap self-service water points.

‘They are all run by dedicated volunteers who have had lots of positive feedback from festival-goers. 

And paramedic teams from South Western Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust reported they have treated 70 patients over the past two days for a mixture of heat-related and medical cases. Above: Revellers stand in the hot sun as they queue for water

And paramedic teams from South Western Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust reported they have treated 70 patients over the past two days for a mixture of heat-related and medical cases. Above: Revellers stand in the hot sun as they queue for water

‘There are a further 850 water points across the site, all with free clean drinking water, many of which are self-serve and available 24 hours. 

The organisers’ decision to ban the sale of plastic bottles has not stopped festival goers from bringing their own bottles, but they are discouraged to do so. 

It is therefore hoped there will be a significant reduction in the 40 tonnes of plastic which were recycled after last year’s event.    

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.