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‘Tired’ nursing student injects woman, 94, with empty syringe

Nursing student accidentally injects 94-year-old woman in Mexico with empty syringe after forgetting to fill it with COVID-19 vaccine because he was ‘tired’

  • Health officials in Sonora, Mexico, confirmed this week that a nursing student used an empty syringe on a woman who was expecting a vaccine shot
  • A video that has gone viral on social media since Saturday shows a man jabbing a 94-year-old woman without placing the dose into the pump 
  • Sonora Heath Secretary deputy Jorge Tadeei said that the student committed ‘a human error’ due to ‘fatigue’ 
  • The elderly woman was eventually located and received her vaccine 

This is the moment a ‘tired’ nursing school student in Mexico injected a 94-year-old woman with an empty syringe instead of giving her a COVID-19 vaccine.

Video of the incident went viral after it was posted on social media last Saturday, prompting health officials in the northwest state of Sonora in Meixco to launch an emergency search for the elderly woman to ensure she was properly vaccinated.

The nursing student, whose name was withheld by Sonora state health authorities, is seen in the video telling the woman in Spanish, ‘you’re going to feel just a small pinch, OK.’

A nursing school student volunteering at a vaccination site in Sonora, Mexico, apologized after he was caught on video prepping to use an empty syringe on a 94-year-old woman who was expecting to receive a COVID-19 vaccination shot. The Sonora state health department located the elderly woman and vaccinated her

A volunteer nursing school student mistakenly used an empty syringe and jabbed an elderly woman who was expecting to get a dose of a coronavirus vaccine shot in Mexico.  Sonora Heath Secretary deputy Jorge Tadeei said the student did it because he was reportedly tired

A volunteer nursing school student mistakenly used an empty syringe and jabbed an elderly woman who was expecting to get a dose of a coronavirus vaccine shot in Mexico.  Sonora Heath Secretary deputy Jorge Tadeei said the student did it because he was reportedly tired

He then says to her, ‘one, two, a pinch,’ and proceeds to drive the needle into her left arm.

‘It’s done,’ he says before the video cuts off.

Sonora Heath Secretary deputy Jorge Tadeei assured local reporters that the student, who was volunteering at the vaccination site, never intended to jab the woman with the empty syringe. 

‘We contacted the guy, who offered an apology. It is a human error. He did it because of fatigue,” Tadeei said.

‘The guy attributes it to human error.  He apologized and we also offer one, too. The lady was located and the vaccine was applied, which is what really worries us.’

Tadeei said the health department was thankful that the incident was caught on video, but at the same time said the footage was ‘something malicious’ that was being utilized as propaganda against the federal government. 

A nursing school student volunteering at a vaccination site in northwestern Mexico applies an empty syringe to a woman who thought she was being vaccinated for the coronavirus

A nursing school student volunteering at a vaccination site in northwestern Mexico applies an empty syringe to a woman who thought she was being vaccinated for the coronavirus

Mexican authorities in recent months have dealt with a wide range of scandals tied to the coronavirus pandemic. 

Officials in the state of Campeche opened an investigation last week after newspaper Reforma reported that more than 1,000 workers at a factory were injected with fake Sputnik V vaccine shots that had been obtained by a Honduras-based textile company.

The same company is also under investigation after customs and military soldiers discovered 1,555 fake vials of the Sputnik V coronavirus immunization shot hidden in a cooler on a private plane moments before it was set to take off for the Central America nation a week earlier.

In late February, United Nations officials in Mexico issued a warning about a criminal organization that was making phone calls to offer the COVID-19 vaccine for sale. 

A clinic in the northeastern state of Nuevo León was shut down in mid-February after fake Pfizer vaccines were administered to at least 80 patients who had paid as much as $2,000 per dose.

World Health Organization data shows that at least 6.2 million people have been vaccinated in Mexico.

According to John Hopkins University, the country has tallied 203,664 confirmed COVID-19 deaths as of Friday. However, the government estimates more than 322,000 deaths. 

The government has reported 12,839,844 confirmed cases. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk