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Tropical storm predicted to form in Gulf of Mexico and bring heavy rains and ‘dangerous storm surge’

Tropical storm predicted to form in Gulf of Mexico and bring heavy rains and ‘dangerous storm surge’ to the local coastal region

  • The weather ‘disturbance’ known as Tropical Cyclone 16 has a 90 percent chance of developing into a tropical storm some time tonight
  • Meteorologists are already calling it Tropical Storm Nestor
  • It’s expected to bring wind gusts of up to 73 mph, heavy rains, and ‘dangerous storm surge’ to the Gulf coastal region
  • Tropical storm warnings have already been issued for parts of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana’s gulf coastal regions 

Americans living along the Gulf coastal region are bracing themselves for some rough weather as a tropical storm is expected to form in the Gulf of Mexico tonight.

The National Weather Service issued a 4pm bulletin warning locals of the developing  ‘disturbance’ known as tropical cyclone 16, which has a 90 percent chance of developing into a tropical or subtropical storm some time tonight.

The agency warned Florida’s west coast to prepare for tropical storm-force wind gusts reaching up to 73 mph in addition to heavy rains and ‘dangerous storm surge’ up to five feet in height.

‘Dangerous storm surge inundation of up to 5 feet above ground level is possible in the areas highlighted in the Storm Surge Watch on this map,’ the agency tweeted late Thursday morning.

The weather ‘disturbance’ known as Tropical Cyclone 16 has a 90 percent chance of developing into a tropical storm some time tonight

The weather anomaly, which meteorologists are already calling Tropical Storm Nestor, was 600 miles southwest of the mouth of the Mississippi River on Friday with wind speeds of about 35 mph

The weather anomaly, which meteorologists are already calling Tropical Storm Nestor, was 600 miles southwest of the mouth of the Mississippi River on Friday with wind speeds of about 35 mph

The weather anomaly, which meteorologists are already calling Tropical Storm Nestor, was 600 miles southwest of the mouth of the Mississippi River on Friday with wind speeds of about 35 mph

The storm is expected to bring wind gusts of up to 73 mph, heavy rains, and 'dangerous storm surge' to parts of the Gulf coastal region

The storm is expected to bring wind gusts of up to 73 mph, heavy rains, and ‘dangerous storm surge’ to parts of the Gulf coastal region

‘Tropical storm force winds are likely for portions of the Gulf Coast where tropical storm watches and warnings are in effect Regardless of the exact track and intensity of this system, these winds will cover a large area, and begin well in advance of the arrival of the center.’

The weather anomaly, which meteorologists are already calling Tropical Storm Nestor, was 600 miles southwest of the mouth of the Mississippi River on Friday with wind speeds of about 35 mph.

It’s moving north at a speed of about 7 mph and is expected to make a northeast turn towards the Florida gulf coastal region.

Forecasters predict the storm could bring up to three inches of rain to the Florida Panhandle coast and up to 1.5 inches further inland.

Tropical storm warnings have been issued from the Mississippi Alabama border region to the area around Florida's Aucilla River and from Grand Isle, Louisiana to the Mouth of the Pearl River

Tropical storm warnings have been issued from the Mississippi Alabama border region to the area around Florida’s Aucilla River and from Grand Isle, Louisiana to the Mouth of the Pearl River

The storms anticipated path flows through parts of Alabama, Georgia and northern Florida.

Tropical storm warnings have been issued from the Mississippi Alabama border region to the area around Florida’s Aucilla River and from Grand Isle, Louisiana to the Mouth of the Pearl River, according to WFTS-TV.

A tropical storm watch is in effect for the Florida region between the city of Yankeetown and the Ochlockonee River.

A storm surge warning has been issued between Florida’s Indian Pass to the city of Clearwater.

Local officials are concerned high winds could weaken the remnants of an 18-story Hard Rock Hotel that collapsed while under construction in New Orleans, killing three.

The system could still be a tropical storm with winds above 39 mph on Sunday morning over eastern North Carolina before moving back over water, forecasters said.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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