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Tropical system near Bermuda looks set to become the earliest third named storm

A tropical system developing near Bermuda in the Atlantic Ocean could set the record as the earliest, third-named storm to take shape ahead of the official hurricane season. 

The NOAA’s National Hurricane Center predicted that the tropical system has a 60 per cent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone.  

Forecasters have begun monitoring a developing system, named Invest 92L by the National Hurricane Center, found 450 miles southeast of Bermuda this week.  

As of Saturday morning, Accuweather reports that the system showed some signs of strengthening, indicated by more pronounced cloud swirls, but was struggling to fully form due to wind shear. 

If the system strengthens into a named storm, it would be the earliest third named storm recorded and go by the name ‘Cristobal.’

The NOAA’s National Hurricane Center predicts that the developing tropical system, called 92L, has a 60 per cent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone

The name was previously used for Hurricane Cristobal in August 2014, which was a Category one storm that passed over Puerto Rico and Iceland. 

Usually, the third-named storm develops much later in the hurricane season and typically occurs in August.

‘August 13 is the average date of the third named storm,’ according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Kristina Pydynowski.  

If 92L amasses enough strength, it could transform into a tropical or subtropical storm in the next 24 to 36 hours. 

92L was spotted by meteorologists 450 miles southeast of Bermuda (pictured) in the Atlantic Ocean

92L was spotted by meteorologists 450 miles southeast of Bermuda (pictured) in the Atlantic Ocean 

If the system strengthens into a named storm, weather officials will call it 'Cristobal'

If the system strengthens into a named storm, weather officials will call it ‘Cristobal’  

The National Hurricane Center issued a Special Tropical Weather on Saturday morning due to 92L. They estimate that the system has a 60 per cent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone within the next 48 hours. 

This year’s hurricane season, which is set annually between June and November, has already been preceded by two unexpected tropical storms in May. 

Tropical Storm Arthur developed on May 16 and narrowly missed North Carolina’s Outer Banks as it moved up the Atlantic Ocean. 

The tropical storm brought torrential rain and flood to Florida over the Memorial Day weekend. A woman pictured walking in massive foods in Miami on Tuesday evening following three days of relentless rain that reached over seven inches

The tropical storm brought torrential rain and flood to Florida over the Memorial Day weekend. A woman pictured walking in massive foods in Miami on Tuesday evening following three days of relentless rain that reached over seven inches 

Drivers struggled to navigate the flooded treats of Miami on Memorial Day following days of heavy rainfall

Drivers struggled to navigate the flooded treats of Miami on Memorial Day following days of heavy rainfall

Tropical Storm Bertha made landfall on May 27 and flooded parts of South Carolina. It also brought three days of torrential rain and flash flood warnings to South Florida.

While it’s not unheard of for preseason tropical storms to develop, there has never been three named storms before before June 1 in the Atlantic Basin. 

‘The earliest number-three tropical storm on record is Colin, which formed on June 5, 2016,’ said AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Joe Lundberg. 

Accuweather suggests that prior to the satellite era, there were probably several tropical storms that went undetected.

‘In 1951, a tropical storm formed in January, then a hurricane followed in May and another tropical system, a depression also formed that same May,’ said Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.

Pictured: a Ventusky weather maps showing the wind speeds in the Atlantic Ocean reaching up to 30mph on Saturday morning

Pictured: a Ventusky weather maps showing the wind speeds in the Atlantic Ocean reaching up to 30mph on Saturday morning 

Pictured: Rainfall was also seen in the Atlantic Ocean on Saturday as the developing tropical system struggles transform into a storm

Pictured: Rainfall was also seen in the Atlantic Ocean on Saturday as the developing tropical system struggles transform into a storm 

There have only been five years where at least two storms in the Atlantic Ocean have been named during May or earlier, including 2016, 2012, 1951, 1908 and 1887.

Weather officials have already warned that the 2020 hurricane season could be an especially active one. 

The National Hurricane Service has revealed they are interested in collecting additional data about 92L and investigating the system area. 

To strengthen, tropical systems must develop over water temperatures of 80 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. On Friday, 92L was floating over waters that peaked at 77 degrees. 

Forecasters have also warned of another hotspot for tropical activities surfacing in the Atlantic Ocean, but it will likely take much longer to form. 

A low pressure area could form next week near the Gulf of Mexico or northwestern Caribbean Sea, but such a development is more common the second week of June.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk