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Trump opponents pledge Britain’s biggest ever protest

Celebrities, politicians and activists are hoping to put on the biggest protest in British history when US president Donald Trump visits the country later this year.

A Facebook group promising ‘the most incredible protest in our history’ has already been created by activist and author Owen Jones, with over 20,000 so far signing up to attend.

It comes after President Trump and Theresa May ordered officials to hammer out plans for a trip as the duo put on an extraordinary show of unity at the Davos conference on Thursday. 

A Facebook group promising ‘the most incredible protest in our history’ has already been created by activist and author Owen Jones, with over 20,000 so far signing up to attend. Pictured: Trump and May in Davos last week  

Now an anti-Trump coalition has vowed to make the protest against Trump the largest in British history - topping 2003's protest against the removal of Saddam Hussein, estimated to have attracted between 750,000 and 1 million people (pictured)

Now an anti-Trump coalition has vowed to make the protest against Trump the largest in British history – topping 2003’s protest against the removal of Saddam Hussein, estimated to have attracted between 750,000 and 1 million people (pictured)

NAn anti-Trump coalition has vowed to make the protest against Trump the largest in British history - topping 2003's protest against the removal of Saddam Hussein, estimated to have attracted between 750,000 and 1 million people. Pictured: Owen Jones' call for action 

NAn anti-Trump coalition has vowed to make the protest against Trump the largest in British history – topping 2003’s protest against the removal of Saddam Hussein, estimated to have attracted between 750,000 and 1 million people. Pictured: Owen Jones’ call for action 

The Stop Trump has called for 'huge opposition' to the US president on the streets of Britain when he visits this year 

The Stop Trump has called for ‘huge opposition’ to the US president on the streets of Britain when he visits this year 

But plans for a red-carpet state visit – including a grand evening with the Queen – are still on ice amid concerns about mass protests.

Now an anti-Trump coalition has vowed to make the protest against Trump the largest in British history – topping 2003’s protest against the removal of Saddam Hussein, estimated to have attracted between 750,000 and 1 million people. 

Meanwhile the likes of Stephen Fry, Walthamstow MP Stella Creasy and activist Paul Mason have all backed a related group aimed at funneling support to organisations Trump is thought to dislike

Meanwhile the likes of Stephen Fry, Walthamstow MP Stella Creasy and activist Paul Mason have all backed a related group aimed at funneling support to organisations Trump is thought to dislike

Reacting to news of the visit, Tottenham MP David Lammy was among those calling for ‘the biggest protest this country has ever seen’. 

His tweet ended: ‘Who’s in?’ 

Meanwhile the likes of Stephen Fry, Walthamstow MP Stella Creasy and activist Paul Mason have all backed a related group aimed at funneling support to organisations Trump is thought to dislike. 

Top Trump Targets explains that when the president visits the UK, they want to ‘put our money where our marching is’ – by donating to ‘groups working with those he has sought to exclude or marginalise’. 

Among the organisations championed by Top Trump Targets are the Abortion Support Network, Help Refugees and Operation Black Vote.        

In May last year, an official petition against the government over plans to provide a state welcome to Trump was signed by more than 1.8 million people. 

Top Trump Targets explains that when the president visits the UK, they want to 'put our money where our marching is' - by donating to 'groups working with those he has sought to exclude or marginalise'

Top Trump Targets explains that when the president visits the UK, they want to ‘put our money where our marching is’ – by donating to ‘groups working with those he has sought to exclude or marginalise’

Among the organisations championed by Top Trump Targets are the Abortion Support Network, Help Refugees and Operation Black Vote

Among the organisations championed by Top Trump Targets are the Abortion Support Network, Help Refugees and Operation Black Vote

Reacting to news of the visit, Tottenham MP David Lammy was among those calling for 'the biggest protest this country has ever seen'

Reacting to news of the visit, Tottenham MP David Lammy was among those calling for ‘the biggest protest this country has ever seen’

The schedule for the visit is now being worked out by officials after Trump and May reaffirmed their commitment to the Special Relationship during talks at the World Economic Forum. Pictured: LGBT charity Stonewall backing the Top Trump Targets campaign 

The schedule for the visit is now being worked out by officials after Trump and May reaffirmed their commitment to the Special Relationship during talks at the World Economic Forum. Pictured: LGBT charity Stonewall backing the Top Trump Targets campaign 

It was debated in Parliament in February last year but the government responded with defiance, stressing: ‘This invitation reflects the importance of the relationship between the United States of America and the United Kingdom’.      

But despite talk of a downgrade, Trump could still get his wish of meeting the Queen.

The schedule for the visit is now being worked out by officials after Trump and May reaffirmed their commitment to the Special Relationship during talks at the World Economic Forum.

The show of unity came after claims of rising tensions, with reports Mr Trump keeps interrupting the PM on the phone and his state visit invite has turned into a 'nightmare'

The show of unity came after claims of rising tensions, with reports Mr Trump keeps interrupting the PM on the phone and his state visit invite has turned into a ‘nightmare’

The encounter - their first face-to-face meeting since September - is being closely scrutinised for signs of friction, after insiders suggested relations have soured

As Mrs May nodded in agreement, Mr Trump said: 'We love your country.'

The encounter – their first face-to-face meeting since September – was closely scrutinised for signs of friction, after insiders suggested relations have soured.  As Mrs May nodded in agreement, Mr Trump said: ‘We love your country.’

They heaped praise on each other in a bid to kill off claims of rising tensions, with reports Mr Trump keeps interrupting the PM on the phone and his state visit invite has turned into a ‘nightmare’. 

There was an extraordinary public row last year after Mr Trump retweeted posts by a British far-right group. The leaders have also disagreed about the Iran nuclear deal and the US decision to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

A plan for him to come to London to open the new US embassy next month was dramatically dropped, fuelling concerns about a breakdown in the historic alliance. 

As the pair posed for photographs at the Swiss ski resort on Thursday, Mrs May nodded along when Mr Trump said he wanted to correct ‘false rumours’ that they did not get on.

‘I think the feeling is mutual from the standpoint of liking each other a lot,’ he said. ‘We love your country.’

He added: ‘There is nothing that would happen to you that we won’t be there to fight for you – you know that.’  

MAY ‘CAT THAT GOT THE CREAM’ AS TRUMP TURNS ON THE CHARM

Donald Trump arrived like a prize fighter before ‘manspreading’ in front of Prime Minister Theresa May, a body language expert has said.

Judi James said she was surprised to see the US President displaying ‘normal body language’ in Davos for the first time in the year she has been studying him.

She said that Mr Trump spoke in an ‘almost romantic tone’ when he referred to supporting Britain’s military – and Mrs May looked like ‘the cat that got the cream’.

Ms James added that Mr Trump displayed ‘no underlying signals of impatience’ while listening to Mrs May – and noted that he turned to look at her speak. 

Mrs May replied: ‘As you say we had a great discussion today and we continue to have that really special relationship with the United States. 

‘We stand shoulder to shoulder because we face the same challenges around the world.’ 

Mrs May said the ‘special relationship’ continued to matter because ‘we are facing the same challenges across the world’. 

She said: ‘We are working together to defeat those challenges.

‘We are working for a good trade relationship in the future that will be to both our benefit.’

Mrs May said it was ‘great to see’ the President as they shook hands, with Mr Trump returning the compliment.

He said: ‘The Prime Minister and myself have had a really great relationship, although some people don’t necessarily believe that but I can tell you I have tremendous respect for the Prime Minster and the job she is doing.

‘And I think the feeling is mutual from the standpoint of liking each other a lot.

‘So there was a little bit of a false rumour out there and I just wanted to correct it frankly.’

Mr Trump said there would be a ‘tremendous increase in trade between our two countries, great for both in terms of jobs’.

‘We look forward to that, we are starting that process pretty much as we speak.’

The PM and President were bombarded with questions about when Mr Trump would take up his state visit invite, but he just said they would be ‘talking about’ the issue. 

Downing Street said the visit would be in the ‘second half of the year’. 

A read-out issued by No 10 revealed that in their private discussions the leaders discussed Bombardier, the aircraft firm that is facing punitive tariffs in a dispute with the US authorities. The PM ‘reiterated the importance of the company’s jobs in Northern Ireland’, according to a spokesman.

The leaders and their teams posed for photographs after they held talks at the World Economic Forum in Davos

The leaders and their teams posed for photographs after they held talks at the World Economic Forum in Davos

They also spoke about Iran, where the governments differ on whether to support the deal to stop it developing nuclear weapons.

‘The Prime Minister updated the President on the good progress which had been made in the Brexit negotiations so far,’ No 10 said. 

‘The two leaders reiterated their desire for a strong trading relationship post-Brexit, which would be in the interests of both countries.’



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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