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US sees record single-day spike with 67,400 new COVID-19 cases

The United States has set yet another record for new coronavirus cases after hitting a single-day spike of 67,400 with almost half of those infections coming from Texas, Florida and California.

Daily cases have been spiking in hot spot states in recent weeks and the US is now averaging about 60,000 infections per day. 

There were 67,417 new cases on Tuesday, bringing the total to more than 3.4 million infections across the US. 

More than 136,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 after 900 additional fatalities were added to the death toll.

Texas reported a record 10,745 cases on Tuesday, while Florida reported 10,181 and California hit 7,346 new infections. 

Florida also surpassed its daily record for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday with 132 additional fatalities. 

There were 67,417 new cases on Tuesday, bringing the total to more than 3.4 million infections across the US

More than 136,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 after 900 additional fatalities were added to the death toll

More than 136,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 after 900 additional fatalities were added to the death toll

Deaths related to COVID-19 have been rising in the last week with about a dozen states reporting increases in deaths for at least two straight weeks, including California, Florida and Texas. 

Meanwhile, 46 states reported more new cases of COVID-19 last week compared to the previous week, according to a Reuters analysis of data from The COVID Tracking Project. 

Nationally, new COVID-19 cases have risen every week for six straight weeks.

Cases are only falling on a weekly basis in New York, Tennessee, New Jersey and Delaware. 

With the virus is spreading quickly in the southern and western states, one of the country’s top public health officials offered conflicting theories about what is driving the outbreak. 

CDC director Robert Redfield says the current spike in COVID-19 infections in the South may have been caused by people from the Northeast traveling there for vacation and not due to states reopening too quickly.   

Addressing the alarming surge in coronavirus cases, Redfield said on Tuesday that infections in Sun Belt states ‘simultaneously kind of popped’ in the second week of June after reopening in various phases. 

Redfield compared it to the initial outbreak in the Northeast in March, which he says spread out to various states from epicenter New York. 

TEXAS CASES: Texas reported a record 10,745 new cases on Tuesday

TEXAS CASES: Texas reported a record 10,745 new cases on Tuesday

TEXAS DEATHS: 87 new deaths were reported in Texas on Monday, down from the record 105 on July 9

TEXAS DEATHS: 87 new deaths were reported in Texas on Monday, down from the record 105 on July 9

CALIFORNIA: The state reported 7,346 new cases on Monday and 47 new deaths

CALIFORNIA: The state reported 7,346 new cases on Monday and 47 new deaths 

FLORIDA CASES: The number of cases in Florida increased by 9,194, bringing the total to 291,629

FLORIDA CASES: The number of cases in Florida increased by 9,194, bringing the total to 291,629

FLORIDA DEATHS: Florida added a record 132 fatalities to its death toll on Monday

FLORIDA DEATHS: Florida added a record 132 fatalities to its death toll on Monday

‘We tried to give states guidance on how to reopen safely. I think the guidance we put out was really sound,’ he said in an interview with Dr Howard Bauchner of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

‘I think if you look critically, few states actually followed that guidance, although I don’t think the reopening’s actually what’s driving the current Southern expansion right now.

‘If you look at the South, everything happened around June 12 to June 16. It all simultaneously kind of popped. 

‘We’re of the view that there was something else that was the driver. Maybe the Memorial Day, not weekend, but the Memorial Day week, where a lot of Northerners decided to go South for vacations.’

Redfield said some states in the South didn’t take social distancing measures as seriously as other parts of the country when they reopened because they didn’t have huge outbreaks. 

This allowed the virus to spread rapidly once it was introduced and take hold in southern states, according to Redfield. 

‘Something happened in mid-June that we’re now confronting right now. It’s not as simple as saying it was related to the timing of reopening and no reopening,’ he said. 

New cases have been spiking in Texas, Florida, Arizona and California in recent weeks and the US is now averaging about 50,000 to 60,000 infections per day. 46 states reported more new cases of COVID-19 last week compared to the previous week

New cases have been spiking in Texas, Florida, Arizona and California in recent weeks and the US is now averaging about 50,000 to 60,000 infections per day. 46 states reported more new cases of COVID-19 last week compared to the previous week

CDC director Robert Redfield said on Tuesday the current spike in COVID-19 infections in the South may have been caused by people from the Northeast traveling there for vacation and not due to states reopening too quickly

CDC director Robert Redfield said on Tuesday the current spike in COVID-19 infections in the South may have been caused by people from the Northeast traveling there for vacation and not due to states reopening too quickly

Redfield did not provide any data to back up his claim that Northeast vacationers may be partly to blame for the current surge in cases. 

CDC officials said that there are various possible explanations and that Redfield was offering just one. 

Redfield said that he believes the US could get COVID-19 under control with four to eight weeks if all Americans wear a mask and continue to social distance. 

‘I think if we can get everyone to wear masks right now, we can bring this under control within four, six, eight weeks,’ Redfield said.  

‘I am glad to see the president and vice president wear a mask. Clearly, in their situation they could easily justify they don’t need to… but we need for them to set the example.’

He said he was ‘worried’ about the fall and winter given it coincides with the flu season. 

‘I do think the fall and the winter of 2020 and 2021 are probably going to be one of the most difficult times that we’ve experienced in American public health because of… the co-occurrence of COVID and influenza,’ he said. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk