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Washington PA has medical license suspended after treating Covid patients with ivermectin

Scott Miller (pictured) is Washougal, Washington, based PA that has been suspended after allegations that he harassed hospitals and inappropriately prescribed drugs to patients to treat COVID-19

A Washington state-based physician assistant (PA) has had his license suspended by a medical board for treating Covid patients with the anti-parasite drug ivermectin and ‘harassing’ hospitals to do likewise.  

Scott Miller of Washougal, Washington, had his medical license suspended by the Washington Medical Commission (WMC) over allegations that his ‘treatment of COVID-19 patients fell below the standard of care.’

Miller is accused of recommending ivermectin, vitamin D and vitamin C supplements among other non-approved treatment to patients who had contracted the virus. 

He also prescribed drugs to at least one patient that he had never examined.

Additionally, the PA is accused of harassing hospitals to treat patients with ivermectin, and even once lied and said he was a patient’s brother in order to recommend certain treatments to the patient’s doctor.  

‘Miller began a public campaign promoting ivermectin as a curative for COVID-19, and prescribed it without adequate examination to at least one person, with no reliable clinical studies that establish its efficacy in preventing or treating COVID-19,’ the WMC wrote in a statement about the suspension.

‘Allegations against Miller also include: interfering with the care of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, engaging in a hostile and and threatening public campaign against both hospitals and individual physicians regarding COVID-19 treatment.’

The commission also alleges that Miller lied on his initial application to get  his license by not disclosing that he was previously under investigation by the State of California’s PA Board.

Miller (pictured) is an advocate for using the anti-parasite drug ivermectin to treat COVID-19, despite no evidence suggesting the drug can combat the virus

Miller (pictured) is an advocate for using the anti-parasite drug ivermectin to treat COVID-19, despite no evidence suggesting the drug can combat the virus

Miller has been suspended after his 'treatment of COVID-19 patients fell below the standard of care', per the Washington Medical Conditions. He has been accused of telling patients that his practice, Miller Family Pediatrics (pictured), does not use masks

Miller has been suspended after his ‘treatment of COVID-19 patients fell below the standard of care’, per the Washington Medical Conditions. He has been accused of telling patients that his practice, Miller Family Pediatrics (pictured), does not use masks

The Columbian reports that there have been more than a dozen complaints about Miller.

Complaints include a November 23, 2020 report that Miller gloated about not using masks at his practice, Miller Family Pediatrics; teaching patients not to use masks; and sharing false information about the virus and the pandemic.

Miller is a known critic of masking and vaccine mandates, according to The Columbian, even showing up at school board meetings in Washington to protest mandates and push ivermectin as a ‘cure’ for the virus.

He previously practiced in California, where he had gotten himself into hot water as well.

Miller was accused by the California medical board of providing care without a supervising physician’s authorization, writing prescriptions without examining patients and for failing to document patients’ medical records.

He has 20 days to appeal the suspension. His practice did not immediately respond to a DailyMail.com request for comment.

A GoFundMe has been set up by a local resident to support Miller and his family (pictured) after his suspension

A GoFundMe has been set up by a local resident to support Miller and his family (pictured) after his suspension

Currently, the Miller Family Pediatrics website has a pop up that takes visitors to a GoFundMe set up for the family

Currently, the Miller Family Pediatrics website has a pop up that takes visitors to a GoFundMe set up for the family

The GoFundMe, which was launched of July 23 on behalf of Shelly Miller, Scott's wife. It has raised over $59,000, but is no longer taking donations as of Wednesday afternoon

The GoFundMe, which was launched of July 23 on behalf of Shelly Miller, Scott’s wife. It has raised over $59,000, but is no longer taking donations as of Wednesday afternoon

The practice’s website has a popup to ‘Support Scott Miller’ and links to a GoFundMe page organized by Joshua Brock, a Camas, Washington resident, and with Miller’s wife, Shelly, listed as a beneficiary.

The fundraiser is no longer accepting donations, as of Wednesday afternoon, but has collected more than $59,000.

The page says the campaign was launched on July 23, months before the recent allegations came to light.

Miller is among a small group of physicians nationwide who have promoted and prescribed ivermectin as a potential cure for COVID-19.

Ivermectin is an anti-parasite drug with no known anti-viral properties and has not demonstrated an ability to fight Covid in real human subjects.

There are clinical trials underway to determine the drug’s effectiveness at fighting the virus, however.

Ivermectin is safe for humans to use, and is approved by regulators to fight parasite related conditions.

But many are hurting themselves, using versions of the drug made for large animals like horses and cows and overdosing.

Ivermectin has been falsely promoted by some as a cure for COVID-19. The anti-parasite drug has no anti-viral properties (file image)

Ivermectin has been falsely promoted by some as a cure for COVID-19. The anti-parasite drug has no anti-viral properties (file image)

Top Ivermectin expert says the drug does not treat COVID-19

Dr. Timothy Geary, one of the world’s foremost experts of Ivermectin, says the drug does not have any effectiveness fighting viruses.

Geary, who is the Research Chair in Parasite Biotechnology at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, says that the 2020 study which spawned much of the Ivermectin-craze is not being correctly read.

Dr Timothy Geary (pictured) is one of the top experts on ivermectin and has researched the drug for  over a decade

Dr Timothy Geary (pictured) is one of the top experts on ivermectin and has researched the drug for  over a decade

He told DailyMail.com that the study did show that Ivermectin could inhibit the replication of COVID-19 virus cells, which is what many are reading from the study that makes them believe the drug has virus killing properties.

Geary explained, though, that the concentration of the drug used in the study were so high that it could not be used for treatment in a human, and would likely cause an overdose.

‘In that study they showed that in cell cultures, Ivermectin could inhibit [Covid] replication, but the concentrations required for that effect were in a range called the micromolar range – very high concentrations relative to what you would find in the plasma of a treated person or an animal, which would be 20 to 50 times lower.’

He does not see too much harm in people using the drug in human-sized doses, though, as Geary assures that it is safe for consumption.

It is safe to use in doses of around 200 micrograms, and even people who are using it to incorrectly treat Covid are unlikely to suffer any major symptoms.

‘There’s no significant toxicity from those doses,’ Geary says.

He also mentioned that the drug has been used billions of times in between humans and animals, and has never shown any ability to combat viruses outside of the laboratory.

The typical Ivermectin prescribed by doctors com in pill form in small doses

The typical Ivermectin prescribed by doctors com in pill form in small doses

But many Americans are facing problems with Ivermectin because they are not using the versions of the drug prescribed by doctors.

Instead, many are finding their own over-the-counter solutions, most notably going to local feed stores and buying medicine meant for horses, cows and sheep.

Prescribed versions of the drug come in pill form, while these versions are liquid.

The dosages are also much larger, meant for an animal that can weigh over 1,000 pounds, not a person that can weight less than one-fifth of that.

Taking doses too large can cause a person to have nausea, body pains, diarrhea limb swelling and other serious side effects.

In more serious cases, a person could overdose and suffer severe damage to their central nervous system, and potentially even die.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk