News, Culture & Society

Where can Australians go on holiday this summer? QLD, NSW, overseas trips planned

Millions of Australians have been given the green light to book a summer vacation, with Queensland the latest state to open its borders to fully-vaccinated travellers. 

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced residents from NSW and Victoria would be able to travel to the Sunshine State without quarantining from November 17. 

It comes just days after NSW declared it would open its doors to the rest of the world from November 1, sending Sydneysiders scrambling to book an overseas flight.

As the weather warms up across the country, Daily Mail Australia have compiled a must-read guide to where you and your family can travel over the festive period, and what restrictions to expect.  

Millions of Australians have been given the green light to book a summer vacation, with Queensland the latest state to open its borders to fully-vaccinated travellers (stock image)

Fully-vaccinated Australians will be able to travel to Queensland for Christmas and summer beach breaks without having to quarantine (pictured, a couple in Surfers Paradise)

Fully-vaccinated Australians will be able to travel to Queensland for Christmas and summer beach breaks without having to quarantine (pictured, a couple in Surfers Paradise)

Queensland

Fully-vaccinated Australians will be able to travel to Queensland for Christmas and summer beach breaks without having to quarantine.

Borders will open to the rest of the country from December 17, but this date could be brought forward if the state hits the 80 per cent double-dose rate sooner than expected.

The Sunshine State will open its doors even if the state doesn’t hit this milestone, the premier has warned, adding this is Queenslanders’ ‘last chance’ to get vaccinated. 

Anyone who has been in an interstate hotspot will be able to travel to Queensland when the state hits the 70 per cent double-dose rate, earmarked for November 19. 

Travellers must arrive by air, return a negative Covid test within 72 hours and spend 14 days in home quarantine. 

These restrictions will be scrapped on December 17, with home quarantine to be extended to international arrivals at 80 per cent and removed at 90 per cent. 

NSW will reopen its border with the rest of the world from November 1, with vaccinated Australians to enjoy quarantine-free travel (pictured, Byron Bay)

NSW will reopen its border with the rest of the world from November 1, with vaccinated Australians to enjoy quarantine-free travel (pictured, Byron Bay)

New South Wales

The state will reopen its border with the rest of the world from November 1, with vaccinated Australians to enjoy quarantine-free travel if they return to NSW.

Also on this date, limits on the number of people allowed into the country via NSW will be scrapped as well as quarantine restrictions on vaccinated travellers. 

On this same date, unrestricted trips between Greater Sydney and regional NSW will also be permitted. 

From October 18, marking the day the state hit the 80 per cent double-dose mark, caravan parks and camping grounds have been reopened. 

Intrastate travel was initially due to restart at the 80 per cent milestone, but has been delayed to allow time for regional NSW to boost their own vaccination rates.  

From November 1, vaccinated Australians will be able to travel overseas from any state, but only NSW will allow them back without quarantine (pictured, a couple in London)

From November 1, vaccinated Australians will be able to travel overseas from any state, but only NSW will allow them back without quarantine (pictured, a couple in London)

Australia's borders will not yet open to tourists, with the focus to remain on giving citizens, permanent residents and their families the chance to travel (pictured, a woman in Singapore)

Australia’s borders will not yet open to tourists, with the focus to remain on giving citizens, permanent residents and their families the chance to travel (pictured, a woman in Singapore)

Overseas

From November 1, vaccinated Australians and their families will be able to travel overseas from any state, but only NSW will allow them back without quarantine. 

Australia’s borders will not yet be open to tourists, with the focus to remain on giving citizens, permanent residents and immediate families the chance to travel.

The Commonwealth Government has made no decision to let in other visa holders including skilled workers, student visa holders or international travellers.  

Australians who arrive in Sydney will still face quarantine requirements when entering other states due to border closures with NSW.

Caps on the number of people allowed into the country through NSW will also be scrapped on November 1.

But with many international airlines scrambling to get their planes out of storage and re-plan routes Down Under, flights in and out of the country may be cancelled or changed at the last minute. 

The Western Australian government has signalled it won't open to Covid-hit states or restart international travel until next year (pictured, a couple on the south coast of Western Australia)

The Western Australian government has signalled it won’t open to Covid-hit states or restart international travel until next year (pictured, a couple on the south coast of Western Australia) 

Western Australia

The Western Australian government has signalled it won’t open to Covid-hit states or restart international travel until next year. 

Premier Mark McGowan has refused to budge on his hard border closure and revealed they will remain closed to the rest of the country until 90 per cent of residents have been vaccinated.

The state is not expected to reach the 80 per cent vaccination milestone until as late as mid-December, meaning thousands of families could be separated for Christmas. 

Fully vaccinated NSW residents will be able to travel to Victoria without having to isolate for 14 days on arrival from October 19 (stock image)

Fully vaccinated NSW residents will be able to travel to Victoria without having to isolate for 14 days on arrival from October 19 (stock image)

Victoria 

Fully vaccinated NSW residents will be able to travel to Victoria without having to isolate for 14 days on arrival from October 19. 

The border will open up to NSW from 11.59pm at October 19, and will require travellers to get tested for Covid-19 three days before arrival.   

Travellers will then get tested as they enter Victoria and will need to isolate until they are given a negative result.

Children under the age of 12, who are at the moment too young for the vaccine, will be allowed to enter the state under their parent’s permit. 

Those who are not fully-vaccinated will still need to complete 14 days of quarantine upon arrival in Victoria.

Travelling to regional areas will remain off limits for Melburnians until the state reaches 80 per cent double dose target, due in early November. 

Premier Peter Gutwein has indicated he won't reopen until all Tasmanians have had the opportunity to be vaccinated against the virus (pictured, South Bruny National Park)

Premier Peter Gutwein has indicated he won’t reopen until all Tasmanians have had the opportunity to be vaccinated against the virus (pictured, South Bruny National Park)

Tasmania

Tasmania is open to travel from Queensland, Western Australia and South Australia but has declared a number of areas in each state as high risk.   

The island state still maintains a hard border with Covid-hit NSW and Victoria and is expected to unveil its reopening plan this week. 

Premier Peter Gutwein has indicated he won’t reopen until all Tasmanians have had the opportunity to be vaccinated against the virus.

He has put in a target of 90 per cent being fully-vaccinated by December 1 and says any decision to reopen to mainland states with Covid-19 will still be subject to public health advice.

South Australia plans to open up its borders to fully-vaccinated travellers just in time for Christmas (stock image)

South Australia plans to open up its borders to fully-vaccinated travellers just in time for Christmas (stock image)

South Australia

South Australia plans to open up its borders to fully-vaccinated travellers just in time for Christmas. 

Premier Steven Marshall said the government was in talks to open to interstate travellers from NSW and Victoria. 

The plan means travellers who are fully-vaccinated won’t have to quarantine once they arrive in the state. 

Mr Marshall added those who have visited exposure sites or had not been fully vaccinated may still face mandatory quarantine. 

Visitors would still need to be tested for Covid-19 with restrictions in place including caps on gatherings and density limits. 

Chief Minister Andrew Barr says travel to Sydney and the NSW south coast is likely to be possible for Canberrans by November (pictured, Sydney International Airport)

Chief Minister Andrew Barr says travel to Sydney and the NSW south coast is likely to be possible for Canberrans by November (pictured, Sydney International Airport)

ACT

While ACT residents are still not able to enter NSW unless for essential reasons, Chief Minister Andrew Barr says travel to Sydney and the NSW south coast is likely to be possible by November.  

Travel restrictions for Canberrans going into NSW are expected to be in place by that point for only high-risk local government areas.

The ACT is also on track to have 99 per cent of its eligible population fully-vaccinated, and is expected to reach the milestone by the end of November.  

Interstate border restrictions are due to be eased in November when 80 per cent of the eligible population will be fully-vaccinated (pictured, Uluru in the Northern Territory)

Interstate border restrictions are due to be eased in November when 80 per cent of the eligible population will be fully-vaccinated (pictured, Uluru in the Northern Territory)

Northern Territory  

Interstate border restrictions are due to be eased in November when 80 per cent of the eligible population will be fully-vaccinated.  

The NT will them move to a ‘traffic light’ system for interstate hotspots with less quarantine restrictions for fully-vaccinated travellers. 

Travellers from ‘red’ zones would be able to quarantine at home instead of in a facility, with those from an ‘orange’ zone required to self-isolate until they return a negative test. 

International arrivals will still face strict Covid-19 protocols if they arrive in the Northern Territory. 

***
Read more at DailyMail.co.uk