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White House: Jackson allegations not backed up by records

WASHINGTON (AP) – The White House says internal records raise doubt about some of the most serious allegations leveled against White House doctor Ronny Jackson in his failed bid to become the next secretary of Veterans Affairs.

Jackson withdrew his nomination Thursday after allegations by current and former colleagues raised questions about his prescribing practices and leadership ability, including accusations of drunkenness on the job. Democratic Sen. Jon Tester’s office collected the allegations, which included a claim that Jackson “got drunk and wrecked a government vehicle” at a Secret Service going-away party.

The records, including police reports, show Jackson was in three minor vehicle incidents in government vehicles during the last five years, but none involved the use of alcohol and he was not found to be at fault.

FILE – In this April 24, 2018, file photo, Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, President Donald Trump’s choice to be secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, leaves a Senate office building after meeting individually with some members of the committee that would vet him for the post, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Jackson is withdrawing from consideration as Veterans Affairs secretary. He said “false allegations” against him have become a distraction. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

FILE - In this April 16, 2018, file photo, U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, M.D., left, sits with Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., chairman of the Veteran's Affairs Committee, before their meeting on Capitol Hill  in Washington. Jackson, President Donald Trump's pick to lead Veterans Affairs withdrew April 26, in the wake of late-surfacing allegations about overprescribing drugs and poor leadership while serving as a top White House doctor, saying the "false allegations" against him have become a distraction. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

FILE – In this April 16, 2018, file photo, U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, M.D., left, sits with Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., chairman of the Veteran’s Affairs Committee, before their meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington. Jackson, President Donald Trump’s pick to lead Veterans Affairs withdrew April 26, in the wake of late-surfacing allegations about overprescribing drugs and poor leadership while serving as a top White House doctor, saying the “false allegations” against him have become a distraction. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

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