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William Tyrrell’s biological grandmother reveals she had suspicions about new person from BEGINNING

The biological grandmother of missing toddler William Tyrrell has revealed she’s suspected the person at the centre of the new police investigation ‘from the beginning’.

The seven year hunt took a dramatic shift this week when police returned to the address in Kendall on the NSW mid-north coast where William was last seen in 2014.

They have launched a massive painstaking search of nearby bushland and the area under the verandah of his foster grandmother’s home.

The sudden switch has sparked an unprecedented attack by NSW police chief Mick Fuller on former top detective Gary Jubelin for leaving the probe in ‘a mess’.

Forensic and bone specialist experts are now poring over every grain of soil in the hunt for any trace of the toddler, as detectives admit they are searching for the boy’s remains.

The biological grandmother of missing toddler William Tyrrell (pictured) admits she’s long suspected the person at the centre of the new police investigation

The seven year hunt took a dramatic shift this week when police returned to the address in Kendall on the NSW mid-north coast (pictured) where William was last seen in 2014

The seven year hunt took a dramatic shift this week when police returned to the address in Kendall on the NSW mid-north coast (pictured) where William was last seen in 2014

Now William’s biological grandmother – who can’t be named for legal reasons – has said she was relieved at the inquiry’s new direction, she told The Daily Telegraph.

She has also been back in touch with previous suspects, Kendall local Paul Savage and washing machine repair man Bill Spedding, in the wake of the new hunt.

After discussing the latest developments with detectives, she said she wanted to tell them she had always thought they were innocent.

‘He (the detective) just rang me, (for the) first time in years,’ she said.

‘He said they’re digging up the garden bed, he’s probably going to be under there somewhere.

‘I went up to Bill Spedding, I went up to Paul Savage, I knew that they didn’t do it. I knew that they weren’t involved in the taking of William. I knew.

 ‘Every day, for the last seven years, I haven’t had a life.’ 

They have launched a massive painstaking search of nearby bushland and the area under the verandah of his foster grandmother's home (pictured)

They have launched a massive painstaking search of nearby bushland and the area under the verandah of his foster grandmother’s home (pictured)

NSW Police Commissioner Fuller admitted on Tuesday that the early years of the investigation had wasted time chasing the wrong suspects. 

Former Detective Chief Inspector Jubelin led the investigation into the missing toddler’s disappearance for five years until he resigned over misconduct allegations.

The ex-homicide detective was convicted of covertly recording four conversations with Mr Savage and was fined $10,000. He later lost a subsequent appeal.

But the NSW Police commissioner attacked his former top detective’s approach to the case which he said had set back the current renewed search.

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller (pictured) admitted on Tuesday that the early years of the investigation had wasted time chasing the wrong suspects

Former Detective Chief Inspector Gary Jubelin (pictured) led the investigation into the missing toddler's disappearance for five years until he resigned over misconduct allegations

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller (left) admitted on Tuesday that the early years of the investigation had wasted time chasing the wrong suspects. Former Detective Chief Inspector Gary Jubelin (right) led the investigation into the missing toddler’s disappearance

NSW Police commissioner Mick Fuller attacked his former top detective's approach to the case which he said had set back the current renewed search which had been left 'a mess' (pictured, police at the search site on Tuesday)

NSW Police commissioner Mick Fuller attacked his former top detective’s approach to the case which he said had set back the current renewed search which had been left ‘a mess’ (pictured, police at the search site on Tuesday)

‘The investigation was looking at some persons of interest that were clearly not, and I think some time was wasted on that, and bushland is overgrown,’ Mr Fuller said on 2GB. 

‘But a new team on-board inherited, what was a bit of a mess, and have cleaned up that investigation.’ 

Detectives on Tuesday stressed they were searching new areas – including around the home of William’s foster grandmother – which had never been searched before. 

Forensic experts brought in luminol spray and UV lights, which can reveal blood spatters, in a nighttime operation under the verandah of the home.

Despite the passing of time, police still hope they might be able to find clues which were missed in previous years of the hunt. 

Detectives on Tuesday stressed they were searching new areas - including around the home of William's foster grandmother (pictured) - which had never been searched before

Detectives on Tuesday stressed they were searching new areas – including around the home of William’s foster grandmother (pictured) – which had never been searched before

Forensic experts brought in luminol spray and UV lights, which can reveal blood spatters, in a nighttime operation under the verandah of the home (pictured)

Forensic experts brought in luminol spray and UV lights, which can reveal blood spatters, in a nighttime operation under the verandah of the home (pictured)

Police are seen sifting through debris near William's foster grandmother's house on Tuesday (pictured)

Police are seen sifting through debris near William’s foster grandmother’s house on Tuesday (pictured)

But on Tuesday, Mr Jubelin hit back at Mr Fuller’s criticism and insisted his bosses had approved of his every move while he was leading the search for little William.

‘I led the investigation for four years during which time detailed reports were submitted on a monthly basis outlining the direction of the investigation,’ he told The Australian.

‘These reports were signed off on at assistant commissioner level and are retained by NSW Police.’

He added: ‘I own and take responsibility for the way I led the investigation. I hope the police who sat above me are prepared to do the same thing.

‘There were a lot of hard-working police on the investigation who were determined to find out what happened to William. I am sure they would not appreciate the public criticism from their commissioner.’

Despite the passing of time, police still hope they might be able to find clues which were missed in previous years of the hunt (pictured, officers checking through soil samples)

Despite the passing of time, police still hope they might be able to find clues which were missed in previous years of the hunt (pictured, officers checking through soil samples)

Forensic officers worked late into the night on Tuesday (pictured) hoping for a breakthrough in the seven year case

Forensic officers worked late into the night on Tuesday (pictured) hoping for a breakthrough in the seven year case

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