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Woman who ‘wasn’t ready to retire’ at 63 is knocked back from 200 jobs in one year 

Woman who refused to retire at 63 after being diagnosed with breast cancer is knocked back from more than 200 jobs in just one year

  • Trish Sara, 63, switched careers later in life in search of a job with more purpose
  • Retirement was not an option for her and she was wanting a job with purpose 
  • She applied for hundreds of job in her field but was constantly getting rejected
  • Sara turned to retail and PR jobs, which she has experience in, but still no luck 

A woman who decided to switch careers later in life has shared her struggle securing work after being knocked back from more than 200 jobs.

Trish Sara, from Sydney, had years of experience working in public relations, retail and interior decorating when she decided to pursue a career in counselling.

The 63-year-old told Daily Mail Australia retirement was not an option for her and she was wanting a job with purpose.

After graduating with a diploma in counselling earlier this year she found it difficult to land a job and decided to apply for jobs outside of her profession. 

But she still had no luck.

Trish Sara, from Sydney, (pictured) had years of experience working in public relations, retail and interior decorating when she decided to pursue a career in counselling

‘Everyone was saying, ”You’re crazy, you’re ready to retire, why are you doing this?” But I wasn’t ready to retire. 

‘I applied over 200 jobs. I’d rewrite my resume every time I applied for a job. I walked around shopping centres with my resume. Nothing,’ she said.

‘I was feeling pretty awful, had my own PR company, I ran my own retail business, I launched Australia’s first website for interior decorating, to feel that I couldn’t even get a job in retail made me feel very devalued. 

Even while battling breast cancer she continued to search for work. 

She believes age played a big role in her failure to secure a job. 

Given her experience, she said there would be no question that she could do the jobs she was applying for.

But out of the hundreds of jobs she applied for, she only heard back from a handful. 

She said she was unsure why employers would turn down someone with extensive experience. 

After graduating with a diploma in counselling earlier this year she found it difficult to land a job and decided to apply for jobs outside of her profession. But she still had no luck (Pictured: A stock image of a rejection letter)

After graduating with a diploma in counselling earlier this year she found it difficult to land a job and decided to apply for jobs outside of her profession. But she still had no luck (Pictured: A stock image of a rejection letter)

‘I suppose they have a perception of what someone is like at a certain age,’ she said. 

She said Treasurer Josh Frydenberg’s push to get over 60 to upskill to be able work longer was frustrating.

She said even with further education, there is no guarantee of securing work. 

On Tuesday Mr Frydenberg told the Committee for Economic Development of Australia residents would needed to work longer because there were fewer younger people to support them.

But Mr Frydenberg says 80 per cent of education happens before Australians turn 21.

‘This will have to change if we want to continue to see more Australians stay engaged in work for longer.’ 

After speaking about her troubles with ABC Radio Sydney’s Breakfast program, Maria Commisson, who runs a program aimed at helping children with learning difficulties, gave her a call offering her a job.  



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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