News, Culture & Society

Expert’s push to call Australian tradies professionals

  • One Australian expert is calling for our young tradies to be called professionals  
  • Tradie numbers are dwindling with thoughts parents are embarrassed by title 
  • Expert believes calling tradies professionals will encourage more to the trade 

Would you hire a yuppie to fix the sink? 

The Masters Builders Association says it’s time to stop calling plumbers, electricians and other skilled labourers ‘tradies’ and start describing them as ‘professionals’ who can earn up to $140,000 a year.

The change is needed to help overcome a shortage of young people learning trades – because their mother’s don’t like the idea, according to MBA NSW executive director Brian Seidler. 

‘Mum is usually the one who has the influence, so we really have to make the industry more attractive to young people and emphasis that a trade can lead to you being a professional,’ Mr Seidler told News Corp.

‘They are not tradies or even builders now – they are professionals.’

An expert is calling for people to call tradies professionals to encourage more young people to the industry (stock photo)

NSW executive director of Master Builders Australia Brian Seidler said parents are embarrassed to have their children called tradies and would rather them called professionals

NSW executive director of Master Builders Australia Brian Seidler said parents are embarrassed to have their children called tradies and would rather them called professionals

‘Mum is usually the one who has the influence, so we really have to make the industry more attractive to young people and emphasis that a trade can lead to you being a professional,’ Mr Seidler said. 

‘They are not tradies or even builders now – they are professionals.’

The executive director said many parents want their children to go to university meaning many young teenagers are avoiding starting a trade.

Despite the attractive six-figure salaries tradies can earn, the number of high school leavers picking up a hands on trades continue to dwindle.

‘Mum and dad want their children to go to university, and the stats are now showing that the majority of people who do uni drop out in their first year, and out of those who are left, the majority don’t necessarily find work in their studied field,’ Mr Seidler told the publication. 

While the number of young people starting a trade hit an all time low this year, experts believe by calling them professionals, it will help boost the industry. 

‘Mum is usually the one who has the influence, so we really have to make the industry more attractive to young people,’ Mr Seidler told News Corp (stock image)

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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