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Boom unveils supersonic XB-1 jet demonstrator capable of hitting speeds of Mach 1.3

Boom, an aviation startup, has unveiled a full-scale prototype of its supersonic jet – the first of its kind to take flight in nearly 50 years.

Called XB-1, the sleek, white aircraft is capable of reaching speeds of Mach 1.3 using three J85-15 engines that are employed by the US military to power fighter jets.

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The demonstrator is set for its first test flight next year and if successful, will pave the way for the full production model Overture to carry up to 88 passengers around the world by 2029.

Overture will stretch 199 feet long and travel at more than twice the sounds of speed, with a range of 5,180 miles per hour – the firm says it can soar from New York to London in just 3.5 hours.

 

Boom, an aerospace startup, has unveiled a full-scale prototype of its supersonic jet – the first of its kind to take flight in more than 50 years

Boom has been working on bringing supersonic travel back for nearly five years.

The firm first unveiled renders for XB-1 in 2016, which was set for test flights a year later and passenger trips by 2020.

And although Boom has been plagued with delays, the reveal of the XB-1 suggests it is now on track.

Boom unwrapped the prototype, dubbed ‘Baby Boom’,to the world Wednesday, revealing the supersonic jet with a 20-foot wingspan and its powerful engines made by General Electric that provide the plane with more than 12,000 pounds of thrust.

Called XB-1, the sleek, white aircraft is capable of reaching speeds of Mach 1.3 using three J85-15 engines that are employed by the US military to power fighter jets

Called XB-1, the sleek, white aircraft is capable of reaching speeds of Mach 1.3 using three J85-15 engines that are employed by the US military to power fighter jets

XB-1, however, is much smaller than its successor, as it only measures 71 feet long and has room for just a pilot.

The craft’s frame is made of a carbon composite that makes it particularly heat resistant and is equipped with a feature made famous by the Concorde – the dropping nose.

However, Baby Boom includes high-resolution cameras in the nose that assist pilots with navigating through supersonic speeds.

The craft¿s frame is made of a carbon composite that makes it particularly heat resistant and is equipped with a feature made famous by the Concorde (pictured) ¿ the dropping nose

The craft’s frame is made of a carbon composite that makes it particularly heat resistant and is equipped with a feature made famous by the Concorde (pictured) – the dropping nose 

The demonstrator (pictured) is set for its first test flight next year and if successful, will pave the way for the full production model Overture to carry up to 88 passengers around the world by 2029

The demonstrator (pictured) is set for its first test flight next year and if successful, will pave the way for the full production model Overture to carry up to 88 passengers around the world by 2029

And the firm says that the systems offers a ‘virtual window through the nose.’

About Boom’s Founder 

Blake Scholl founded the Colorado-based company in 2014, with a vision to bring high-speed travel back to the world – an idea that was inspired by seeing the Concorde in a museum.

Before he stepped in to the aviation space, the CEO help leadership roles at Amazon and Groupon, along with co-founding the mobile technology startup Kima Labs.

Scholl started out as a software engineer at Amazon in 2001 and cofounded Kima Labs nine years later, which was acquired by Groupon in 2012.

He has a BS in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University.

‘XB-1 is the end-product of years of development effort, including multiple wind tunnel trials, dozens of structural tests, hundreds of simulation iterations, and tens of thousands of work hours,’ Boom shared in a statement.

Boom has used a slew of modern technologies in designing the prototype, one being 3D printing – it partnered with VELO3D to design these parts.

Benny Buller, CEO and Founder of VELO3D, said: ‘Aviation hardware is especially difficult to manufacture with 3D metal printing, due to challenging aerodynamic designs that must be balanced with superior durability and high temperature requirements.’

‘VELO3D’s technology allows the production of lightweight, complex designs for mission-critical applications in the toughest operating conditions. Our partnership with Boom is truly an advancement for the metal AM industry, and XB-1 supersonic aircraft is a game-changer for the aviation industry.’

The printed Titanium parts are used for engine hardware, the environmental control system, and structural components. Characteristics of the geometric designs include tall, thin walls with high aspect ratios, which are inherently difficult to manufacture with either traditional processes such as welding and casting, or even most existing 3D-printing technologies.

Boom unwrapped the prototype, dubbed ¿Baby Boom¿,to the world Wednesday, revealing the supersonic jet with a 20-foot wingspan and its powerful engines made by General Electric that provide the plane with more than 12,000 pounds of thrust

Boom unwrapped the prototype, dubbed ‘Baby Boom’,to the world Wednesday, revealing the supersonic jet with a 20-foot wingspan and its powerful engines made by General Electric that provide the plane with more than 12,000 pounds of thrust

Boom has used a slew of modern technologies in designing the prototype, one being 3D printing ¿ it partnered with VELO3D to design these parts

Boom has used a slew of modern technologies in designing the prototype, one being 3D printing – it partnered with VELO3D to design these parts

Flight tests of XB-1 are set to commence next year that could lead the way for Overture to take to the sky by 2029.

Boom says Overture will accommodate the use of next-generation alternative fuels and have a carbon footprint comparable to that of present-day business-class travel.

It hopes the new craft will make supersonic travel affordable.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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