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Chinese students are raking in up to $100,000 a year by selling baby formula overseas

Chinese students are raking in up to $100,000 a year by selling baby formula online – as new register offers to keep track of overseas shoppers

  • A register has been proposed to stop baby formula being exported by overseas
  • Comes after shoppers flee supermarkets with trolleys of baby formula in tow
  • The supermarket daigou register is set to be pitched to executives next month

As Australian parents continue to battle to buy baby formula, a new register has been proposed to stop the lucrative product from being exported by overseas buyers.

The proposition comes after frantic shoppers were filmed fleeing supermarkets with trolleys of baby formula in tow.

However, an alternative was suggested this week to help solve the supermarket chaos.

The proposed register comes after one woman admitted to Daily Mail Australia she earns $90,000 each year selling formula overseas.

 

As Australian parents continue to battle to buy baby formula, a new register has been proposed to stop the lucrative product from being exported by overseas buyers 

The proposition comes after frantic shoppers have been filmed fleeing supermarkets with trolleys of baby formula in tow 

The proposition comes after frantic shoppers have been filmed fleeing supermarkets with trolleys of baby formula in tow 

Molder Sayrao began her lucrative business when she arrived in Sydney to study at Macquarie University in 2014 and her family asked her to send things back.

Word spread and soon the 31-year-old was shipping bags of vitamins, skincare products, and baby formula through social media app WeChat.

Following the phenomenon, a daigou – or overseas personal shoppers – register will be pitched to supermarket executives next month.

The register hopes to keep track of the country’s estimated 40,000 daigou, according to Seven News.

This would allow buyers to place unlimited orders and through this, give manufacturers a better understanding of the product’s demand. 

A similar system is said to be in place for multivitamins and has yet been a way to avoid similar drama.  

The plan would also aid supermarkets’ profit margins and ultimately stop scuffles in the aisles. 

A supermarket daigou - or overseas personal shopper - register will be pitched to executives next month

A supermarket daigou – or overseas personal shopper – register will be pitched to executives next month

Earlier this month, Melbourne mother Catherine Urriola, 34, was left traumatised after encountering ‘chaotic scenes’ in the baby formula aisle at Woolworths. 

Ms Urriola, a sales representative, captured video footage of the desperate shoppers scuffle towards boxes of baby formula stationed in the middle of the aisle.

The tins, which were yet to be stocked onto the shelves, continue to cause headlines across the country as shoppers pack supermarkets for the sought-after product which is popular on China’s black market.

The video footage shows a number of shoppers walk hastily towards the boxes, while Ms Urriola narrates the scene.

‘Look at this, look. Unbelievable,’ she said in the video. 

Catherine Urriola, 34, was left traumatised after encountering 'chaotic scenes' (pictured) in the baby formula aisle at Woolworths in Dandenong, south-east Melbourne 

Catherine Urriola, 34, was left traumatised after encountering ‘chaotic scenes’ (pictured) in the baby formula aisle at Woolworths in Dandenong, south-east Melbourne 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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