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Hells Angel Dayne Brajkovich has to wear make-up to cover his gang tattoos in WA

A notorious gang enforcer could be forced to wear make-up to cover his tattoos once a tough new law is passed banning the public display of gang insignia.

The new bill, which is touted as Australia’s ‘toughest’, targets 46 clubs including the Hells Angels, Rebels, Bandidos, Gypsy Jokers and Coffin Cheaters by banning all wording associated with them in public.

Acting WA Police commissioner Col Blanch said people such as heavily-tattooed Hells Angel Dayne Brajkovich may need to start wearing make-up or ‘band-aids’.

Among Brajkovich’s many tattoos are the word ‘Hells Angels’ on his forehead and ‘1%er’ on his neck.

The tattoo ‘1%er’ is accepted as claiming ownership of an outlaw motorcyle gang and widely taken to mean the wearer has committed violent acts for their club.

Acting WA Police commissioner Col Blanch said people such as heavily-tattooed Hells Angel Dayne Brajkovich (pictured) may need to start wearing make-up or ‘band-aids’ to avoid breaking a new law – or he could always leave the state

The new bill, which is touted as Australia's 'toughest' targets 46 clubs including the Hells Angels, Rebels, Bandidos, Gypsy Jokers and Coffin Cheaters by banning all wording associated with them in public

The new bill, which is touted as Australia’s ‘toughest’ targets 46 clubs including the Hells Angels, Rebels, Bandidos, Gypsy Jokers and Coffin Cheaters by banning all wording associated with them in public

The law would make it illegal to ‘display prohibited insignia’, including the wearing of gang patches and even going out in public with visible tattoos referencing gangs.

It will go before Western Australian parliament this week and will likely pass.

Facial tattoos, clothing, or even stickers or painted insignia on a motorcycle or car will be included in the bill.

‘I would start with things like Band-Aids or makeup certainly or have it removed or alternatively, people can choose the option not to live in Western Australia if this law passes,’ Mr Blanch told 6PR’s Mornings Program, referring to Brajkovich.

In April, WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson slammed Brajkovich’s attire at a Perth Magistrates Court sentencing hearing as ‘unacceptable’.

He wore a jersey emblazoned with the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club initials HAMC and with ‘HOF CITY’ on it, believed to be a nod to a chapter the gang has in the German city of Hof.

His jersey also bore the numbers 81 on the jersey, a not-so-subtle nod to Hells Angels, with H being the eighth letter in the alphabet and A the first.

Hells Angels sergeant-at-arms Dayne Brajkovich is renowned for his distinctive tattoos covering much of his body. He's pictured at a previous court appearance

Hells Angels sergeant-at-arms Dayne Brajkovich is renowned for his distinctive tattoos covering much of his body. He’s pictured at a previous court appearance

Brajkovich bashed Rebels bikie kingpin Nick Martin during a brawl at a bar on November 24, 2020, two weeks before Martin was shot dead at the Perth Motorplex in Kwinana Beach. 

Mr Dawson said Brajkovich’s tattoos and clothing are ‘totally disrespectful to not only the court but to the community’.

‘This is not us being hyper-sensitive about what people wear, this is absolute defiance in saying ‘I’m outside the law and I’m going to remain outside the law’.’

The maximum penalties for wearing prohibited insignia under the new law are 12 months in jail, a $12,000 fine for individuals or up to $60,000 for ‘corporations’. 

Mr Blanch said the law was anti-bikie gangs, not anti-tattoos.

‘Young men are attracted to biker clubs because of the display of being an outlaw motorcycle gang to have the insignia on display as power, the display of numbers.’

Brajkovich's bizarre fashion statement leaving court came under fire for Western Australian Police Commissioner Chris Dawson (pictured)

Brajkovich’s bizarre fashion statement leaving court came under fire for Western Australian Police Commissioner Chris Dawson (pictured)

Under the new law, gang members could also face a $12,000 fine and 12 months in jail for ‘consorting’ after being issued with a notice to disperse. 

Gang members can be ordered to stay away from each other for three years and after two or more breaches, the gang members could face up to five years in jail.

WA Police Minister Paul Papalia said the new law was part of a plan to ‘methodically dismantle bikie gangs in this State’.

‘We are determined to make WA a safe place, without the fear of bikies pursuing their own vendettas at the expense of law-abiding citizens.’

Brajkovic was charged over a brawl in November - two weeks before Martin's death - in which the pair fought in a busy bar in the Perth beachside suburb of Scarborough

Brajkovic was charged over a brawl in November – two weeks before Martin’s death – in which the pair fought in a busy bar in the Perth beachside suburb of Scarborough

WA Attorney General John Quigley said the legislation deliberately names ’46 organisations, including outlaw motorcycle gangs from right across Australia, their affiliate gangs or “feeder clubs” and street gangs’. 

‘These organisations and their patches are designed to show affiliation with criminality and intimidate others, including law-abiding citizens in our community. This will cease once these laws are in place.’

‘These laws represent the toughest and most comprehensive reforms to fight organised crime of all Australian States and Territories.’

 

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