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Hypersonic jet in new Top Gun movie could be a REAL to secret aircraft 

REVEALED: Hypersonic jet piloted by Tom Cruise in new Top Gun movie was developed by legendary Skunk Works stealth jet plant and could be a real top secret aircraft

  • Lockheed Martin CEO James Taiclet confirmed that Skunk Works worked with the producers of the upcoming Top Gun: Maverick movie starring Tom Cruise
  • Manufacturers helped create the design for the fictional Darkstar hypersonic jet which looks to be based off of renderings of the SR-72 hypersonic jet
  • The SR-72 is currently being developed by Lockheed Martin in California, and according to the company’s website the jet could be operational by 2030
  • The SR-72 is the predecessor of the SR-71 which broke speed records when it flew from New York to London in less than two hours in 1976

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The hypersonic jet featured in the new Top Gun movie was developed by legendary US aircraft manufacturers and may depict a top secret stealth jet. 

Lockheed Martin Corporation CEO James Taiclet confirmed that Skunk Works, the company’s secretive development arm, worked with the producers of the upcoming Top Gun: Maverick movie starring Tom Cruise, TheDrive.com reported. 

The manufacturers helped create the design for the fictional Darkstar hypersonic jet which looks to be based off of renderings of the highly anticipated SR-72 hypersonic jet. 

Manufacturers helped create the design for the fictional Darkstar hypersonic jet (pictured in Top Gun: Maverick) which looks to be based off of renderings of the SR-72 hypersonic jet

The SR-72 is currently being developed by Lockheed Martin in California, and according to the company's website the jet could be operational by 2030 (rendering pictured)

The SR-72 is currently being developed by Lockheed Martin in California, and according to the company’s website the jet could be operational by 2030 (rendering pictured)

In a LinkedIn post, Taiclet said members of the Skunk Works team 'partnered with Top Gun's producers to bring cutting-edge, future forward technology to the big screen'

In a LinkedIn post, Taiclet said members of the Skunk Works team ‘partnered with Top Gun’s producers to bring cutting-edge, future forward technology to the big screen’

In a LinkedIn post, Taiclet said members of the Skunk Works team ‘partnered with Top Gun’s producers to bring cutting-edge, future forward technology to the big screen’ and referenced ‘critical work in hypersonic flight’

And in an April tweet, Lockheed Martin executive John Neilson posted that the Darkstar jet could provide a ‘sneaky peak at what might be the Lockheed Martin SR-72.’ 

The SR-72 is currently being developed by Lockheed Martin in California, and according to the company’s website they say the plane could be operational as early as 2030.

It is the successor of the SR-71 which broke speed records when it flew from New York to London in less than two hours in 1976.

Skunk Works helped create the design for the fictional Darkstar hypersonic jet which looks to be based off of renderings of the highly anticipated SR-72 hypersonic jet (pictured in Top Gun: Maverick)

Skunk Works helped create the design for the fictional Darkstar hypersonic jet which looks to be based off of renderings of the highly anticipated SR-72 hypersonic jet (pictured in Top Gun: Maverick)

And in an April tweet, Lockheed Martin executive John Neilson posted that the Darkstar jet could provide a 'sneaky peak at what might be the Lockheed Martin SR-72'

And in an April tweet, Lockheed Martin executive John Neilson posted that the Darkstar jet could provide a ‘sneaky peak at what might be the Lockheed Martin SR-72’

Envisioned as an unmanned aircraft, the SR-72 (rendering pictured) would fly at speeds up to Mach 6, or six times the speed of sound, Lockheed Martin has said previously.

Envisioned as an unmanned aircraft, the SR-72 (rendering pictured) would fly at speeds up to Mach 6, or six times the speed of sound, Lockheed Martin has said previously.

Skunk Works is known for its stealthy work; it created the first US spy plane, as well as the the fast Blackbird and, later on, the stealth jet.

Lockheed Martin’s Hypersonics program manager Brad Leland wrote that the plane is designed to ‘strike at nearly any location across a continent in less than an hour.’

‘Speed is the next aviation advancement to counter emerging threats in the next several decades. The technology would be a game-changer in theater, similar to how stealth is changing the battlespace today,’ Leland said.

The jet is expected to be around the same size as an F-22 and powered by a full-scale, combined cycle engine.

Envisioned as an unmanned aircraft, the SR-72 would fly at speeds up to Mach 6, or six times the speed of sound, Lockheed Martin has said previously.

At this speed, the aircraft would be so fast, an adversary would have no time to react or hide.

Hypersonic jets, flying at up to Mach 5, or 3,800 mph, could allow passengers to dramatically cut journey times.

For example, a commercial flight from New York to Shanghai currently takes about 15 hours – but at hypersonic speeds, could take two.

WHAT WAS THE BLACKBIRD SR-71 SPY PLANE?

The SR-71 Blackbird was the world’s fastest and highest-flying operational manned aircraft during its 20-year operational run from 1966-1998.

On July 28 1976 the groundbreaking spy plane broke the world record for absolute altitude – reaching 85,069 feet (25,929 metres).

That same day a different SR-71 set an absolute speed record of 2,193 mph (3,529 kph) – a record it still holds today.

The plane was so fast that it could outrun surface-to-air missiles as it travelled close to the edge of space around 16 miles (25 km), above Earth.

If a surface-to-air missile launch was detected, the standard evasive action was simply to accelerate and outfly the missile.

The SR-71 Blackbird (file photo) was the world's fastest and highest-flying operational manned aircraft during its 20-year operational run from 1966-1998. On July 28 1976 the groundbreaking spy plane broke the world record for absolute altitude - reaching 85,069 feet (25,929 metres). That same day a different SR-71 set an absolute speed record of 2,193 mph (3,529 kph) - a record it still holds today

The SR-71 Blackbird (file photo) was the world’s fastest and highest-flying operational manned aircraft during its 20-year operational run from 1966-1998. On July 28 1976 the groundbreaking spy plane broke the world record for absolute altitude – reaching 85,069 feet (25,929 metres). That same day a different SR-71 set an absolute speed record of 2,193 mph (3,529 kph) – a record it still holds today

The plane flew so high above the Earth’s surface that US pilots said there was no real sense of speed at all with the clouds so far below.

A total of 32 of the aircraft were built. Twelve were lost in accidents but none were ever shot down.

In late 1957, the CIA approached the defence contractor Lockheed to build an undetectable spy plane and within ten months they had come up with the design for the Blackbird.

Flying at 80,000 ft (24,000 metres) meant that crews could not use standard oxygen masks, which would not provide enough of the gas above 43,000 ft (13,000 metres), so specialist protective pressurised suits were made.

The plane’s titanium skin was capable of surviving temperatures up to 482°C (900°F).

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk