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Inside the Wanda Metropolitano that will host Liverpool and Tottenham

Inside the incredible 68,000-capacity Wanda Metropolitano stadium that will host the Champions League final between Liverpool and Tottenham

Atletico Madrid’s Wanda Metropolitano is only the third largest stadium in Spain but it is fully equipped to host the biggest game in world football.

Tottenham and Liverpool will do battle at the 67,829-seater venue when the Champions League final comes to the Spanish capital on June 1.

Both sets of fans are likely to enjoy their visit — though some more than others depending on the result — to the Wanda Metropolitano, which boasts modern facilities while also retaining the feel of a traditional sports ground. 

Atletico Madrid’s Wanda Metropolitano will host the 2019 Champions League final on June 1

The stadium, which reopened in 2017, is the third largest in Spain with a capacity of 67,829

The stadium, which reopened in 2017, is the third largest in Spain with a capacity of 67,829

The Wanda boasts modern facilities while also retaining the feel of a traditional sports ground

The Wanda boasts modern facilities while also retaining the feel of a traditional sports ground

That is, perhaps in some part, because the stadium is not strictly brand new. It reopened in 2017 after a £208million rebuild but it was originally erected in 1994 as part of Madrid’s failed bid to host the 1997 World Athletics Championships. 

Wanda Metropolitano

  • Built in 1994 as 20,000-capacity ground for athletics but closed 10 years later
  • Atletico Madrid took possession of stadium in 2013
  • Reopened in 2017 as 67,829-seater football venue after £208m rebuild

Atletico took possession of the stadium in 2013 and transformed it from a 20,000-capacity venue to huge arena fit to entertain footballing royalty at UEFA’s biggest party of the year.

Fans who are able to get a ticket will have to pay a premium to be at the Wanda for its biggest fixture to date. Liverpool and Spurs have been allocated just over 16,000 tickets each — priced at £60, £154, £385 and £513 depending on their view of the pitch. A small number of tickets are described as ‘restricted view’ but still cost between £120 and £410.

For those who want to enjoy the final in luxury — or just don’t mind spending a fortune to guarantee they can be at the game — hospitality packages are being sold for hefty four-figure sums. For example, ‘Silver’ packages were last week available for £6,000 per person plus VAT. These entitle the buyer to food, plus access to a hospitality lounge with unreserved seating before and after the match, but not during the half-time interval. 

Final tickets have been priced between £60 and £513 with some described as 'restricted view'

Final tickets have been priced between £60 and £513 with some described as ‘restricted view’

Fans will be able to buy snacks and drinks from the many fast food counters inside the stadium

Fans will be able to buy snacks and drinks from the many fast food counters inside the stadium 

Hospitality packages will entitle supporters with bigger budgets to enjoy pre-match food

Hospitality packages will entitle supporters with bigger budgets to enjoy pre-match food

Tickets which grant supporters access to hospitality lounges cost around £6,000 plus VAT

Tickets which grant supporters access to hospitality lounges cost around £6,000 plus VAT

While fans are set for a mad scramble to get tickets and sort travel plans, both squads of players will be relaxing over the next fortnight to make sure they are well rested for what for many is the biggest match of their careers. 

When they arrive at the Wanda Metropolitano, Liverpool players will prepare for the game in Atletico’s huge home dressing room, which features padded seats below screens that display their faces and act as electronic name tags. Spurs, meanwhile, will be housed in the much smaller and less glamorous away dressing room.

UEFA initially drew Spurs as the designated home team for the final but, due to ‘operational reasons’, officials decided a switch was necessary. The decision to make the teams swap dressing rooms is linked to Liverpool fans being given the south side of the stadium.

Stadium manager Fernando Fariza told Sportsmail: ‘The decision was made after taking into account where the two teams’ fan zones would be situated in the city and what route they would take to the stadium.’  

Once changed, players will make their way down a steep staircase which leads to the 105m x 68m pitch where the eyes of the world will be on them.

Liverpool players will use Atletico's home dressing room which is spacious and comfortable

Liverpool players will use Atletico’s home dressing room which is spacious and comfortable

The home dressing room features padded seats and screens that act as electronic name tags

The home dressing room features padded seats and screens that act as electronic name tags

Spurs players will be in the away dressing room which is much smaller than the home one

Spurs players will be in the away dressing room which is much smaller than the home one

Once changed, players will make their way down a steep staircase which leads to the pitch

Once changed, players will make their way down a steep staircase which leads to the pitch

The stadium has three large video scoreboards which can be used to show match highlights

The stadium has three large video scoreboards which can be used to show match highlights

The roof of the Wanda Metropolitano lights up in red and the stadium looks impressive at night

The roof of the Wanda Metropolitano lights up in red and the stadium looks impressive at night

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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