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Latina mother takes 19-year-old disabled son out of school every day to administer medical weed

A dedicated mother of a special needs student in Northern California makes her dutifully visit to his high school to assure herself that he receives his daily round of cannabis oil as a preventative measure for his severe seizures.

The only drawback is that after Karina Garcia drives from the family home in San Bruno, California, to the South San Francisco school, she has to remove Jojo, 19, out of the classroom.

Garcia, 38, broke down the most difficult process of her routine, making sure mother and son are exactly 1,000 feet away from school grounds just to administer a few drops of the medically prescribed marijuana into his mouth.

Karina Garcia has to drive every day to JoJo’s high school to give him a dose of medical marijuana

In order for JoJo to receive his required dose of prescribed medical marijuana to combat his epilepsy, his mother had to take him away from school grounds

In order for JoJo to receive his required dose of prescribed medical marijuana to combat his epilepsy, his mother had to take him away from school grounds

Although marijuana use has been legalized for personal and medicinal use in the Golden State, federal laws prohibits a student like JoJo from taking their prescribed doses on school property.

‘He’d go to school and he’d seize all day and he wouldn’t be able to stay there because the seizures took a lot out of him,’ Garcia told Fox affiliate KTVU. 

After prescription meds stopped short of doing anything to subdue the severeness that JoJo’s epileptic convulsions presented, Garcia turned weed as a means to save her son, who was just a three-month-old baby when he was diagnosed with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

JoJo, as his friends and family members affectionately call him, has been authorized a note for dosages of a cannabis oil that contains the chemical cannabidiol, or CBD. It also carries a trace amount of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. Both are extracted from the marijuana plant. 

One of the four dosages of cannabis oil that a 19-year-old high school student with epilepsy is required to take during school hours

One of the four dosages of cannabis oil that a 19-year-old high school student with epilepsy is required to take during school hours

The youngster, who is set to graduate from South San Francisco High School in June 2019, has to take four doses from two types of oil – one of them during school hours – that have incredibly done its wonders on JoJo.

‘It’s changed our life,’ Garcia said. ‘ it’s given my son his life back.’

State Senator Jerry Hill became aware of JoJo’s condition and has vowed find a solution.

The Democrat lawmaker introduced bill SB1127 that will let individual school districts decided if a child’s parent can administer the drug at schools. According to the law’s guidelines, the medical weed can’t be smoked or vaped.

A judge in California last week ruled in favor of a five-year-old girl, who suffers from Dravet syndrome, to attend her first day of kindergarten and to have a school nurse administer medical marijuana to her gums. 

Brooke Adams has battled the constant and prolonged seizures and need to have with her at all times a THC oil and cannabidiol, a marijuana compound also known as CBD, that causes her seizures to stop.

A ruling is expected by November.

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THC AND CBD

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are both derived from the cannabis plant. 

Together, they are part of the cannabinoid group of compounds found in hashish, hash oil, and most strains of marijuana. 

THC is the psychoactive compound responsible for the euphoric, ‘high’ feeling often associated with marijuana.

THC interacts with CB1 receptors in the central nervous system and brain and creates the sensations of euphoria and anxiety. 

CBD does not fit these receptors well, and actually decreases the effects of THC, and is not psychoactive. 

CBD is thought to help reduce anxiety and inflammation. 

There could be a roadblock since schools receive federal educational funds and marijuana is only legalized by some state governments. 

Out of 31 states and Washington, D.C, that have give the green light towards the use of medical marijuana, seven states have passed laws that allow students to use it at school facilities. 

The consumption of smokeless weed products for children that have prescriptions has gotten the OK inside school property in New Jersey, Illinois, Delaware and Colorado.

‘It’s opening the door to safe access and that’s what the movement is all about,’ Garcia said. ‘I think that’s what the face of my son represents.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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