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Mum shares her ‘life-changing’ trick for keeping children’s lunchbox sandwiches fresh for a WEEK 

A mum has revealed how she keeps the sandwiches she prepares for her kids fresh for five days of school lunches.

Kate posted on Facebook to say she makes the sandwiches the day she buys bread and freezes them straightaway so they are ‘super fresh’. 

‘I’m one of those mums who freezes sandwiches because I’m time poor during the week and my kids only eat “boring sandwiches” anyway,’ Kate wrote.

A mum who only buys bread once a week has revealed how she keeps the sandwiches she prepares for her kids fresh for five days of school lunches by freezing them the day she buys the bread (pictured)

Kate posted on Facebook to say she makes the sandwiches the day she buys the bread and freezes them straightaway so they are 'super fresh' - and includes a range of fillings (pictured)

Kate posted on Facebook to say she makes the sandwiches the day she buys the bread and freezes them straightaway so they are ‘super fresh’ – and includes a range of fillings (pictured)

‘They de-frost super quick, so they just come out in the morning and go straight into the lunchbox. Unless I’m working and I do lunches the night before.’ 

The Australian mother explained that her children’s sandwiches normally contain a combination of deli meats or hams, roast meats and cheese with mustard or a spread like peanut butter, Nutella, Vegemite or spreadable cheese. 

She also gets the bread cut lengthways at the bakery, which Kate said is both ‘easier’ and quicker for cutting the crusts off.

She also gets the bread cut lengthways at the bakery (pictured), which Kate said is both 'easier' and quicker for cutting the crusts off

She also gets the bread cut lengthways at the bakery (pictured), which Kate said is both ‘easier’ and quicker for cutting the crusts off

Buttering both sides of the bread helps to keep the sandwich together when it comes out of the freezer, while you should avoid wet foods like tomatoes to stop it going soggy (pictured)

Buttering both sides of the bread helps to keep the sandwich together when it comes out of the freezer, while you should avoid wet foods like tomatoes to stop it going soggy (pictured)

After she shared her trick online, thousands were quick to praise the mum’s idea.

Some shared their own modifications for the trick, noting that buttering both sides of the bread helps to keep the sandwich together when it comes out of the freezer, while avoiding any wet foods like tomatoes means it won’t go soggy. 

‘Little tips and tricks like this can make such an impact on busy mornings,’ one parent posted. 

‘I love this – life-changing trick,’ another added. 

Nutritionist and former English teacher Lee Holmes (pictured) revealed how to pack the perfect lunchbox - and it all comes down to including as many different ingredients as possible

Nutritionist and former English teacher Lee Holmes (pictured) revealed how to pack the perfect lunchbox – and it all comes down to including as many different ingredients as possible

'A nutritionally-balanced lunchbox should contain an array of food from various food groups,' Lee said. She recommends plant-based treats (stock image)

‘A nutritionally-balanced lunchbox should contain an array of food from various food groups,’ Lee said. She recommends plant-based treats (stock image)

Recently, a nutritionist and former English teacher revealed how to pack the perfect lunchbox – and it all comes down to including as many different ingredients as possible.

What does the ideal school lunch contain? 

* WHOLEGRAIN OR SOURDOUGH BREAD: Slow release carbohydrates help to stabilise blood sugar levels.

* PROTEIN: Lean meat, salmon, tuna, egg or tofu will help with alertness and endurance.

* HEALTHY FATS: Things like sunflower seeds, avocado and pumpkin seeds increase satiety, help to stabilise kids’ moods and boost their concentration.

* VEGETABLES X 2-3: Foods such as capsicum, carrot, mashed potato and cucumber contain fibre, vitamins and minerals kids need to keep their immune systems healthy.

Sydney-based expert Lee Holmes said that over her years as a teacher, she has ‘seen the impact that nutritious meals can have on students’ and how it can really make a difference to their performance in the classroom. 

Firstly, Lee said your child should always be involved in the choosing of your child’s lunchbox – as this will make them more likely to want to eat from it later.

‘Let your child be involved in the purchasing of their lunchbox, make sure it’s sturdy with a strong lid, insulated or comes with an ice pack,’ Lee said.

She recommends picking something with separate pockets or ‘sections’ in them to avoid cross-contamination and ensure wet and dry foods are kept separately. 

When it comes to what you should keep in your child’s lunchbox, Lee said colour is key for visual appeal.

‘A nutritionally-balanced lunchbox should contain an array of food from various food groups,’ Lee said.

She recommends plant-based treats like fresh juices and smoothies, chopped-up vegetables and hummus and seeds, as well as blueberries and strawberries over jelly and rich jams.

‘Use different types of fruits and vegetables, seeds, coconut flakes, full fat calcium rich dairy foods, protein rich foods such as meats, eggs, seed butters, pulses and tuna and oily fish,’ the nutritionist advised.

They will need some form of carbohydrates and healthy fats to ensure they stay full through the long day.

Things like sunflower seeds, avocado and pumpkin seeds can increase satiety, help to stabilise kids’ moods and boost their concentration.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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