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Police to hand out on-the-spot fines for anyone not wearing a face covering in shops from July 24

Retailers have today called for more clarity after the government announced face masks will become compulsory in all stores from next week.

Shoppers who fail to comply risk fines of £100 under the plans to stop a second wave of coronavirus.

Only young children or those with certain disabilities will be exempt from the new regulations which come in on Friday, July 24.

Retailers will be asked to advise customers to wear masks but their staff will not be expected to enforce the law.

Instead, police will be given powers to dish out fines.

The law will require people to wear simple cloth face coverings, rather than the medical grade masks used by front-line NHS workers. 

But speaking on Radio 4 today, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan admitted one in ten people are still refusing to wear a mask on public transport. 

He said a suggestion that people refusing to wear a face covering on the Tube were not being fined or stopped was ‘not true’. 

Shoppers who fail to comply risk fines of £100 under the plans to stop a second wave of coronavirus. Pictured: Prime Minister Boris Johnson wearing a face mask during the Coronavirus while campaigning in his Uxbridge constituency

Retailers will be asked to advise customers to wear masks but their staff will not be expected to enforce the law. Pictured: Members of the public wear face masks as they shop on Princess Street, Edinburgh

Retailers will be asked to advise customers to wear masks but their staff will not be expected to enforce the law. Pictured: Members of the public wear face masks as they shop on Princess Street, Edinburgh

Only young children or those with certain disabilities will be exempt from the new regulations which come in on Friday, July 24. Pictured: Pedestrians pass a John Lewis store in central London

Only young children or those with certain disabilities will be exempt from the new regulations which come in on Friday, July 24. Pictured: Pedestrians pass a John Lewis store in central London

Masks are already compulsory on public transport and the Prime Minister hinted on Friday that the Government is poised to extend the requirement to retail premises to help control the virus spread

Masks are already compulsory on public transport and the Prime Minister hinted on Friday that the Government is poised to extend the requirement to retail premises to help control the virus spread

The British Retail Consortium today welcomed the ‘clarity’ on the use of face coverings in shops in England after days of ‘mixed messages’.

‘The clarity we’re going to get today for implementation in about 10 days’ time is going to give a level of reassurance,’ chief executive Helen Dickinson told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

‘What we saw over the weekend with mixed messages, I think made it really difficult for people to understand what it was they’re expected to do.

‘Clarity is really important to give people that confidence. It is absolutely true that sales and footfall are returning only very slowly to our high streets and town centres and shopping centres up and down the country.’ 

Sadiq Khan also said he welcomes the Government’s ‘U-turn’ on making face coverings mandatory in shops in England.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, he said the evidence from experts was the measure could make a ‘massive difference’ in helping to tackle coronavirus.

He said: ‘The advice is, where it’s not possible to keep your social distance, particularly if you’re in confined spaces indoors, shops, supermarkets and the like, gyms is another good example, this small measure can make a massive difference along with other measures.

‘Clearly, if it’s not practical to do so, think of a pub, a bar, or restaurant, in those places, it shouldn’t be mandatory.’ 

He told BBC Radio 4 that British Transport Police (BTP) and enforcement officers were using ‘encouragement where possible’ as well as stopping travellers, asking them to leave or issuing fines if the failed to comply with the rule requiring the wearing of face coverings on public transport.

Mr Khan added: ‘Our enforcement officers and the BTP have stopped in the region of 18,500 people stopping travelling because they refuse to wear face coverings and actually the fines that have had to be issued so far is only 59.

‘And during rush hour we have more than 90% compliance.’ 

He claimed the government’s concern about police standing on the streets issuing fines was ‘misfounded and misplaced.’

He added: ‘The problem is not the issue of enforcement, the problem is the mixed messaged and the confused communication, that has been the issue. 

‘The government needs to ensure that the test, trace, isolate system is fully operational – all these things will lead to consumer confidence and the public having confidence to return to the shops.

‘If it’s safe to do so of course I want people to return to return to the fantastic culture we have in London, to their place of work if it’s safe to do so. 

‘It’s really important the government gets a grip, makes sure the public has confidence the virus is under control. Then you’ll see people returning to the shops, return to work.’

The Daily Mail revealed yesterday that the Government has procured ten factory production lines capable of making five million masks a week.

Face coverings have been compulsory on public transport since June 15 and, last Friday, Scotland ordered shoppers to wear them.

Government sources said guidance on masks in other settings would be ‘kept under review’.

The government’s move to make face mask compulsory comes as:

  • The UK announced 11 more coronavirus deaths in the preliminary daily toll, taking the total number of victims to 44,840;
  • More than 100 outbreaks of coronavirus in schools, businesses and pubs are ‘swiftly and silently’ being dealt with every week across the UK, Health Secretary Matt Hancock revealed;
  • The drive to bring workers back to the office from coronavirus lockdown hit a roadblock after some of country’s biggest firms said only 40 per cent will return from home;
  • Councils in England are preparing to make significant cuts in jobs and services after losing income on investments in airports, cinemas and offices amid the coronavirus pandemic;
  • British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca is preparing to launch human trials of an antibody treatment that could protect old and vulnerable people from coronavirus;
  • Beauty salons, nail bars and tattoo shops in England opened the first time in four months as part of the latest relaxation of lockdown restrictions;
  • Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months, according to research that suggests the virus could infect people on an annual basis, like the flu.

The move may anger those who find them uncomfortable or dislike the idea of state compulsion.

One libertarian Tory MP has already vowed to stop shopping rather than wear a mask. 

But Boris Johnson yesterday said they were important in confined spaces as ‘a kind of extra insurance’.

A Downing Street spokesman said: ‘There is growing evidence that wearing a face covering in an enclosed space helps protect individuals and those around them from coronavirus. 

A further 21 people have died from coronavirus in 24 hours bringing the UK’s total death toll to 44,819 

‘The Prime Minister has been clear that people should be wearing face coverings in shops and we will make this mandatory from July 24.’

The move follows days of confusion about the Government’s stance on the issue.

On Sunday, Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove said that while it was ‘basic good manners’ to wear masks in shops it would not be made compulsory.

He said it was ‘always better to trust to people’s common sense’.

How the government’s line on face coverings has changed over the months 

March 12: Deputy chief medical officer Dr Jenny Harries: ‘For the average member of the public walking down a street, it is not a good idea… in fact, you can actually trap the virus in the mask and start breathing it in.’

April 16: Chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty said: ‘The evidence is weak, but the evidence of a small effect is there under certain circumstances.’

April 21: Revealed in meeting minutes a month later, Sage advised: ‘On balance, there is enough evidence to support recommendation of community use of cloth face masks, for short periods in enclosed spaces, where social distancing is not possible.’

April 23: Dr Jenny Harries said there could be ‘a very, very small potential beneficial effect in some enclosed environments’.

April 24: Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: ‘On masks, as more information comes through, the science is constantly evolving and we always bear in mind that science and then take the decision. As of today, the government position is unchanged.’

April 30: Boris Johnson said: ‘I do think that face coverings will be useful, both for epidemiological reasons, but also for giving people confidence that they can go back to work.’

May 20: Researchers in Hong Kong found face masks reduced infection by up to 75 per cent. 

June 4: Transport Secretary Grant Shapps announced that face coverings will be mandatory on public transport from June 15. He said: ‘With more people using transport the evidence suggests wearing face coverings offers some – albeit limited – protection against the spread for the virus.’

June 5: Health Secretary Matt Hancock revealed plans to make face coverings compulsory in hospitals for all staff, visitors and outpatients from June 15, but a furious NHS boss said the decision was made ‘without any notice or consultation’. Meanwhile, Grant Shapps said masks would not be required in other settings such as shops because people spend little time in close proximity.

June 12: German study suggests making face masks compulsory could slow the spread of Covid-19 by as much as 40 per cent.

July 10: The PM says the government ‘needs to be stricter in insisting people wear face coverings in confined spaces’. A government source later briefs that it is a ‘fair assumption’ that masks will become mandatory in shops and other indoor settings within a few weeks.

July 12: Michael Gove says masks will not be compulsory in shops in England, insisting it is best to ‘trust’ the public and wearing a face covering is a matter of ‘good manners’.

July 13: Mr Johnson says an announcement will be made ‘in the coming days’ on upgrading the advice on using face coverings. 

A Whitehall source played down the idea of a Cabinet split, but acknowledged that Mr Gove’s intervention had been ‘unhelpful’.

Mr Johnson, who was initially sceptical about face masks, yesterday said there was growing evidence they could help slow the spread of coronavirus.

Speaking on a visit to the London Ambulance Service yesterday, the Prime Minister, who was wearing a mask, said they had ‘a great deal of value in confined spaces’ where people are coming into contact with those they do not normally meet.

He added: ‘As the virus comes down in incidence and we have more and more success, I think face coverings are a kind of extra insurance we can all use to stop it coming back and stop it getting out of control again.’

Face masks have been compulsory in shops in many European countries for months. The Czech Republic introduced the requirement on March 18, with Austria following suit on April 6, Germany on April 22, France on May 10 and Spain on May 20.

But in the UK, both Government scientists and ministers have questioned their value.

In March, deputy chief medical officer Jenny Harries said wearing a mask could ‘trap the virus’ and cause the person wearing it to breathe it in.

‘For the average member of the public walking down a street, it is not a good idea [to wear a face mask],’ she added.

But scientists have changed their view as evidence of the risk of asymptomatic and airborne transmission has grown. Officials now believe that face coverings can help stop people spreading the virus, particularly when they do not know they have it.

Royal Society president Dr Venki Ramakrishnan yesterday said the evidence was ‘now quite strongly in favour of using face coverings in enclosed spaces where we’re likely to come into contact with strangers’.

He added: ‘The Government should be very clear. It’s not consistent to make it mandatory on public transport and not make it mandatory in other enclosed and busy public spaces, because the behaviour of the virus is the same in all of these spaces.’

The move is part of a wider push to open up the economy and give consumers confidence to go out and spend.

Downing Street yesterday confirmed that official advice to work from home where possible is now under review. The PM said last week that people should ‘start to go to work now if you can’.

Mr Johnson is planning to set out a new ‘road map’ this week setting out a nine-month timetable for easing social distancing measures in the hope of giving people the confidence to return to near-normal life.

But Tory MP Sir Christopher Chope said the mask policy would have the opposite effect. Speaking at the weekend, he said: ‘I don’t think I will be going in shops if they impose a condition that people wear masks.’

James Daunt, managing director of bookseller Waterstones, yesterday said asking customers to wear a face covering was not a problem.

He told Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘If it reassures people, then it is a perfectly reasonable measure to take.’

But Mr Daunt said staff working across his chain of stores could not be asked to police the policy. ‘There will be a tiny, tiny minority of people who will be confrontational over it and it is not the position of shop workers to enter into that situation,’ he said.

Labour health spokesman Jonathan Ashworth said the Government’s policy was muddled.

He added: ‘Why yet again have ministers been slow in making a decision in this pandemic, and why will it take another 11 days before these new guidelines to come into force?’ 

Eight out of 10 Covid-19 patients died in one English hospital as NHS data reveals ‘stark’ differences in death rates across the country with fewer than half surviving at 11 trusts
By Sam Blanchard Senior Health Reporter for MailOnline

Coronavirus death rates vary massively across NHS hospitals in England, according to shocking data.

Eight out of 10 infected patients have died in one hospital in the South West — but just 12.5 per cent succumbed to the illness in a London trust. 

The data, seen by The Guardian, showed more than half of Covid-19 patients have died in at least 11 hospital trusts across the country.

Data from a study presented to government scientists last month showed the death rate for hospitalised patients is 28 per cent across the UK, on average.

But information being sent to senior doctors, which the NHS denies is official, shows that this varies wildly between hospitals.

Twenty-six NHS trusts had death rates lower than a quarter — between 12.5 per cent and 25 per cent. But rates were higher at the remaining 109.

Experts said the huge disparity in death rates did not necessarily mean patients were getting worse care, but that it could be a consequence of the population in the area or the number of patients they had treated. 

Older people are more likely to die from coronavirus and some regions have far more older people — the average age in the South West, for example, is eight years higher than it is in London.  

NHS England said it did not produce the data — which the newspaper said had been adjusted for age — and say they appear to be ‘experimental’.

For comparison, the national death rate for everyone who tests positive — not only  hospital patients — is 4.2 per cent in the US, 4.6 per cent in Germany, and 15.5 per cent in the UK. The infection itself is thought to kill around 1 per cent of all cases — but not everyone who catches the virus gets spotted.

Hospitals across the country have varying death rates from coronavirus, according to secret NHS data (stock image)

Hospitals across the country have varying death rates from coronavirus, according to secret NHS data (stock image)

The NHS data showed that two of the five hospital trusts with the highest death rates were in the South West — one with 80 per cent and another with 62 per cent.

Specific trusts were not named in the report, The Guardian said, and were referred to only by the region they were in.

Other hospitals where more than half of patients were dying included one in the North West (68 per cent), the East of England (60 per cent) and one in London (54 per cent).

Three of the hospitals with the lowest death rates were in London — with 12.5, 14 and 15 per cent — along with one in the Midlands (13 per cent) and one in the South East (15 per cent). 

Dr Alison Pittard, chief of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine, told the newspaper: ‘That is a huge variation, a huge range. 

HOW DO OFFICIAL DEATH RATES COMPARE BY REGION? 

Public Health England publishes weekly reports which show the total number of people who have been diagnosed, and the total number of deaths, in each region.

These should include all hospital patients but also include people who have tested positive and died outside of hospital.

This is how the regions break down: 

  1. London (19.8%)
  2. West Midlands (19.6%)
  3. East of England (18.6%)
  4. South West (16%)
  5. South East (15.9%)
  6. North East (15.6%)
  7. North West (15.4%)
  8. East Midlands (14.8%)
  9. Yorkshire & The Humber (13%) 

‘I’m surprised at the degree of variation. A spread between 12.5 per cent and 80 per cent is quite stark.’

She added: ‘We know that poorer communities and BAME communities have a higher risk of mortality, so if a trust is in an area of higher-risk individuals you would expect that trust’s Covid-related mortality rate to be higher.’

The exact factors that have played into some NHS trusts having significantly higher death rates are not clear.

The ethnicity of patients in a NHS trust’s area, how wealthy they are and their general health are all contributing factors.

Data has shown non-white people, those in poorer areas and people with existing health conditions are all more likely to die if they catch Covid-19.

Hospitals with small numbers of patients may also have an artificially high death rate because an increase of one could push the average up significantly.  

The NHS data gives a breakdown of 135 major hospital trusts around the country and calculated how many of the diagnosed patients died, to get a rate of death.

It is not publicly available, however, so it is unknown whether some regions’ hospitals were suffering significantly more fatalities than others. 

NHS England denied that it had produced the data.

It said in a statement: ‘We do not recognise these figures, which appear to be experimental analysis of unverified data, but there is now a wide range of published data on the role that health inequalities, including pre-existing conditions and other health factors, have played when it comes to the impact of Covid, including from the ONS and PHE.

‘The NHS is accelerating work to tackle health inequalities, and will shortly be providing local services with a range of actions they should build in to their plans for the coming months.’ 

Public Health England publishes weekly data showing how deaths break down by region, which shows that London has the highest overall death rate for all patients.

In the capital 19.8 per cent of people — not necessarily all admitted to hospital — have died of the virus, compared to 19.6 per cent in the West Midlands and 18.6 per cent in the East of England.

The lowest regional death rate has been in Yorkshire and The Humber, where 13 per cent of people officially diagnosed have died.

The other regions had death rates of 16 per cent in the South West, 15.9 per cent in the South East, 15.6 per cent in the North East, 15.4 per cent in the North West and 14.8 per cent in the East Midlands.

Separate regional data from Public Health England shows that London has the highest death rate among people who have officially tested positive for Covid-19. There, 19.8 per cent of patients have died

Separate regional data from Public Health England shows that London has the highest death rate among people who have officially tested positive for Covid-19. There, 19.8 per cent of patients have died

Government papers published last week after being presented to officials in June showed that the average hospital death rate has been just over a quarter across the UK. 

A study of 64,066 hospital patients with Covid-19 in the UK found that 28 per cent of them – more than one in four – die with the disease.

Deaths were higher for people admitted to intensive care, of whom 35 per cent succumbed to the disease, and even higher for those who had to be put onto ventilators – 42 per cent.

The COVID-19 Clinical Information Network (CO-CIN), comprised of university experts from around the UK, presented the results to SAGE – the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies – on June 22.

The study had found people spend an average of nine days in hospital if they are admitted with coronavirus, or catch it while on a ward.

Some 16 per cent of patients require high-flow oxygen therapy to help them breathe.

The most common symptoms for hospital patients are coughs (63 per cent), fever (62 per cent) and shortness of breath (61 per cent) – but a worrying one in 16 people (6 per cent) claimed to have had no symptoms at all, the study found.

WHICH HOSPITAL TRUSTS HAVE HAD THE MOST COVID-19 DEATHS IN TOTAL? (NHS England data to July 13)
NHS trust name Total
ENGLAND 29,079
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS BIRMINGHAM NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 960
BARTS HEALTH NHS TRUST 623
LONDON NORTH WEST UNIVERSITY HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 608
PENNINE ACUTE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 551
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF DERBY AND BURTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 518
KING’S COLLEGE HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 511
ROYAL FREE LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 486
LIVERPOOL UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 468
MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 437
IMPERIAL COLLEGE HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 427
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF LEICESTER NHS TRUST 424
EAST KENT HOSPITALS UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 419
BARKING, HAVERING AND REDBRIDGE UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 417
LEWISHAM AND GREENWICH NHS TRUST 411
SANDWELL AND WEST BIRMINGHAM HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 379
WEST HERTFORDSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 368
FRIMLEY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 363
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF NORTH MIDLANDS NHS TRUST 352
EAST SUFFOLK AND NORTH ESSEX NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 351
LEEDS TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 333
MID YORKSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 326
SOUTH TYNESIDE AND SUNDERLAND NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 325
CHELSEA AND WESTMINSTER HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 308
BASILDON AND THURROCK UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 305
NORTHAMPTON GENERAL HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 302
CROYDON HEALTH SERVICES NHS TRUST 300
ST GEORGE’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 295
THE ROYAL WOLVERHAMPTON NHS TRUST 285
SHEFFIELD TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 285
LUTON AND DUNSTABLE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 282
WORCESTERSHIRE ACUTE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 276
EPSOM AND ST HELIER UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 275
NOTTINGHAM UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 270
NORTH MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 267
THE DUDLEY GROUP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 263
SURREY AND SUSSEX HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 259
SOUTH TEES HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 254
WRIGHTINGTON, WIGAN AND LEIGH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 253
COUNTY DURHAM AND DARLINGTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 252
LANCASHIRE TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 247
SOUTHEND UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 243
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS COVENTRY AND WARWICKSHIRE NHS TRUST 238
WIRRAL UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 238
BLACKPOOL TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 237
NORTH WEST ANGLIA NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 234
GUY’S AND ST THOMAS’ NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 230
BRADFORD TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 230
WALSALL HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 229
DONCASTER AND BASSETLAW TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 229
PORTSMOUTH HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 229
BOLTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 226
COUNTESS OF CHESTER HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 224
BEDFORD HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 219
STOCKPORT NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 215
KETTERING GENERAL HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 214
YORK TEACHING HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 214
MID CHESHIRE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 212
TAMESIDE AND GLOSSOP INTEGRATED CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 212
DARTFORD AND GRAVESHAM NHS TRUST 209
ST HELENS AND KNOWSLEY TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 207
HULL UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 204
NORTHUMBRIA HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 202
THE PRINCESS ALEXANDRA HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 201
EAST LANCASHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 200
THE ROTHERHAM NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 196
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL SOUTHAMPTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 196
MID ESSEX HOSPITAL SERVICES NHS TRUST 194
GLOUCESTERSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 194
ASHFORD AND ST PETER’S HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 189
ROYAL BERKSHIRE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 186
OXFORD UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 181
MEDWAY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 180
SALFORD ROYAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 178
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 175
GEORGE ELIOT HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 174
SHREWSBURY AND TELFORD HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 169
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF MORECAMBE BAY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 169
THE HILLINGDON HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 165
EAST AND NORTH HERTFORDSHIRE NHS TRUST 164
KINGSTON HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 164
HAMPSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 161
NORTH CUMBRIA INTEGRATED CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 159
CALDERDALE AND HUDDERSFIELD NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 156
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS BRISTOL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 151
SOUTHPORT AND ORMSKIRK HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 149
THE QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL, KING’S LYNN, NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 148
BARNSLEY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 148
HOMERTON UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 147
BRIGHTON AND SUSSEX UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 147
EAST CHESHIRE NHS TRUST 143
UNITED LINCOLNSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 141
NORTH TEES AND HARTLEPOOL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 140
WARRINGTON AND HALTON TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 136
GATESHEAD HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 135
CHESTERFIELD ROYAL HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 132
MAIDSTONE AND TUNBRIDGE WELLS NHS TRUST 131
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 130
GREAT WESTERN HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 125
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 124
SHERWOOD FOREST HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 124
NORFOLK AND NORWICH UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 123
NORTH BRISTOL NHS TRUST 119
NORTHERN LINCOLNSHIRE AND GOOLE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 118
JAMES PAGET UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 117
SOUTH WARWICKSHIRE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 117
THE NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 116
WESTERN SUSSEX HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 113
WHITTINGTON HEALTH NHS TRUST 111
AIREDALE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 108
MILTON KEYNES UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 104
ROYAL SURREY COUNTY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 97
EAST SUSSEX HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 91
HARROGATE AND DISTRICT NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 81
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS PLYMOUTH NHS TRUST 81
WEST SUFFOLK NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 79
THE ROYAL BOURNEMOUTH AND CHRISTCHURCH HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 67
ROYAL UNITED HOSPITALS BATH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 66
ROYAL CORNWALL HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 65
WYE VALLEY NHS TRUST 56
SALISBURY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 56
ROYAL BROMPTON & HAREFIELD NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 49
POOLE HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 48
KENT COMMUNITY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 47
ROYAL DEVON AND EXETER NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 46
NORTH EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 44
SOMERSET NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 43
ISLE OF WIGHT NHS TRUST 39
TORBAY AND SOUTH DEVON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 39
BIRMINGHAM COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 37
GLOUCESTERSHIRE HEALTH AND CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 34
NORFOLK COMMUNITY HEALTH AND CARE NHS TRUST 28
WORCESTERSHIRE HEALTH AND CARE NHS TRUST 28
CORNWALL PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 26
YEOVIL DISTRICT HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 26
ANGLIAN COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE CIC – FRYATT HOSPITAL 25
DORSET COUNTY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 24
OXFORD HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 23
ROYAL PAPWORTH HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 22
LEICESTERSHIRE PARTNERSHIP NHS TRUST 21
NORTHERN DEVON HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 21
BERKSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 20
THE ROYAL MARSDEN NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 19
LIVERPOOL HEART AND CHEST HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 19
SUSSEX COMMUNITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 18
ESSEX PARTNERSHIP UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 17
EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 17
DERBYSHIRE COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 17
SOUTHERN HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 17
DORSET HEALTHCARE UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 16
SHROPSHIRE COMMUNITY HEALTH NHS TRUST 15
THE ROYAL ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 15
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 13
CITY HEALTH CARE PARTNERSHIP CIC – EAST RIDING COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 13
THE CHRISTIE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 13
MIDLANDS PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 12
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 11
HERTFORDSHIRE PARTNERSHIP UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 10
CENTRAL LONDON COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 10
Royal Hospital for Neuro-Disability West Hill 10
THE WALTON CENTRE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 10
HCA UK – The Wellington Hospital North Building 9
Hospital of St John & St Elizabeth – Hospital of St John & St Elizabeth 9
GREATER MANCHESTER MENTAL HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 9
HERTFORDSHIRE COMMUNITY NHS TRUST 8
CUMBRIA, NORTHUMBERLAND, TYNE AND WEAR NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 7
TEES, ESK AND WEAR VALLEYS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 7
PROVIDE – BRAINTREE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 6
CENTRAL AND NORTH WEST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
The London Clinic – 20 Devonshire Place 6
NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE COMBINED HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 6
NHS NIGHTINGALE HOSPITAL NORTH WEST 6
PENNINE CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
TAUNTON AND SOMERSET NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
THE ROBERT JONES AND AGNES HUNT ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 5
WILTSHIRE HEALTH & CARE – SAVERNAKE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 5
ANGLIAN COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE CIC – CLACTON HOSPITAL 4
NHS NIGHTINGALE HOSPITAL LONDON 4
OXLEAS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
ROYAL NATIONAL ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 4
WEST LONDON NHS TRUST 4
LEEDS AND YORK PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
ROTHERHAM DONCASTER AND SOUTH HUMBER NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
ALDER HEY CHILDREN’S NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
CHESHIRE AND WIRRAL PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
VIRGIN CARE LTD – PAULTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 4
EAST COAST COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE – BECCLES HOSPITAL 3
LINCOLNSHIRE COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES NHS TRUST 3
MERSEY CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 3
Central Surrey Health – WALTON COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 3
NORFOLK AND SUFFOLK NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
PROVIDE – ST PETERS HOSPITAL 2
HCA UK – London Bridge 2
HCA UK – The Princess Grace 2
SOUTH LONDON AND MAUDSLEY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
DERBYSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
BRADFORD DISTRICT CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
Sheffield Health and Social Care NHS Foundation Trust 2
BMI Healthcare – Mount Alvernia 2
Oldercare (Haslemere) Limited – ST MAGNUS HOSPITAL 2
SOLENT NHS TRUST 2
VIRGIN CARE SERVICES LTD – SHEPPEY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 2
LIVEWELL SOUTHWEST – MOUNT GOULD HOSPITAL 2
WESTON AREA HEALTH NHS TRUST 2
WILTSHIRE HEALTH & CARE – CHIPPENHAM COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 2
WILTSHIRE HEALTH & CARE – WARMINSTER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 2
CAMBRIDGESHIRE AND PETERBOROUGH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
Elysium Healthcare Limited 1
PROVIDE – HALSTEAD HOSPITAL 1
HCA UK – The Lister 1
LINCOLNSHIRE PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
Ramsay Health UK – Nottingham Woodthorpe 1
HUMBER TEACHING NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
SHEFFIELD CHILDREN’S NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
NORTH WEST BOROUGHS HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
Central Surrey Health – WOKING COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 1
KENT AND MEDWAY NHS AND SOCIAL CARE PARTNERSHIP TRUST 1
Nuffield Health – Woking 1
VIRGIN CARE SERVICES LTD – LIVINGSTONE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 1
Cygnet Health Care Limited 1
VIRGIN CARE LTD – ST MARTINS HOSPITAL 1

 

 

 

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