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Princess Amalia of the Netherlands admits she’s ‘not ready to be queen’ in new biography

Princess Amalia of the Netherlands admits she is not ready to be queen in an authorised biography published today. 

Amalia, 17, said she would ask her Argentine-born mother, Queen Maxima, 50, to step in temporarily if her father, King Willem-Alexander, 54, were to die suddenly.

‘But I said to my father: you just keep on eating healthy and exercising a lot,’ the teenage princess added. 

The biography, simply titled ‘Amalia’, was written with the approval of the Royal Family to mark Amalia’s 18th birthday on December 7.

It offers a rare glimpse into the princess’s private life, which has been closely guarded by her parents since Willem-Alexander ascended the throne in 2013. 

Princess Amalia of the Netherlands admits she is not ready to be queen in an authorised biography published today. Pictured, Amalia, centre, with her sisters Princess Ariane (left) and Princess Alexia (right) and their parents King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima 

The biography offers a rare glimpse into the princess's private life, which has been closely guarded by her parents since Willem-Alexander ascended the throne in 2013. Pictured, a photo of Amalia trying on a toy crown as a young girl, which is published in the biography

The biography offers a rare glimpse into the princess’s private life, which has been closely guarded by her parents since Willem-Alexander ascended the throne in 2013. Pictured, a photo of Amalia trying on a toy crown as a young girl, which is published in the biography

Amalia, 17, said she would ask her Argentine-born mother, Queen Maxima, 50, to assume the throne if her father, King Willem-Alexander, 54, were to die suddenly. Pictured, King Willem-Alexander and his eldest daughter Amalia in a sweet snap published in 'Amalia'

Amalia, 17, said she would ask her Argentine-born mother, Queen Maxima, 50, to assume the throne if her father, King Willem-Alexander, 54, were to die suddenly. Pictured, King Willem-Alexander and his eldest daughter Amalia in a sweet snap published in ‘Amalia’

Biographer Claudia de Breij reveals Amalia had a part-time job at a beachside cafe, feels self-conscious when she is recognised by members of the public and would pursue a career as a singer or equestrian if she was not destined to be queen. 

Along with her sisters Princess Alexia, 16, and Princess Ariane, 14, Catharina-Amalia spent the early years of her life at Eikenhorst Villa in Wassenaar, an affluent suburb of The Hague. 

‘We do our best to be really with them – on holidays or weekends or even at breakfast in the mornings,’ Willem-Alexander once said in an interview.

The family enjoyed days out cycling and to the beach, and holidays to Maxima’s home country of Argentina.

However life changed in 2013 when Amalia’s grandmother Queen Beatrix abdicated and Willem-Alexander ascended the throne. The new king and queen moved their daughters into Huis ten Bosch, the royal palace in The Hague.

Along with her sisters Princess Alexia, 16, and Princess Ariane, 14, Catharina-Amalia spent the early years of her life at Eikenhorst Villa in Wassenaar, an affluent suburb of The Hague. Pictured, the young princess Amalia in a photo published in the biography

Along with her sisters Princess Alexia, 16, and Princess Ariane, 14, Catharina-Amalia spent the early years of her life at Eikenhorst Villa in Wassenaar, an affluent suburb of The Hague. Pictured, the young princess Amalia in a photo published in the biography

The princess, pictured in a photo provided by the royal family and published in the biography, said she would pursue a career as a singer or an equestrian if she was not heir to the throne

The princess, pictured in a photo provided by the royal family and published in the biography, said she would pursue a career as a singer or an equestrian if she was not heir to the throne

As well as excelling at school and becoming an accomplished horse rider (as seen in a photo taken in June), Amalia had a part-time job as a beachside cafe where she was 'cocktail queen'

As well as excelling at school and becoming an accomplished horse rider (as seen in a photo taken in June), Amalia had a part-time job as a beachside cafe where she was ‘cocktail queen’

Nine-year-old Amalia became The Princess of Orange, the title given to the heir to the throne. 

Speaking ahead of his investiture, Willem-Alexander said: ‘Amalia’s title will be made formal when she’s 18 and she enters the State Council. Until then, we will protect her as much as possible.

‘That means she won’t participate in official engagements, or as little as possible. Her environment right now should only include her parents, her sisters, and her friends.’

Now that time is less than a month away and the biography has been released as a way to introduce the princess to her future subjects.  

Biographer Claudia de Breij, pictured with the princess, reveals Amalia had a part-time job at a beachside cafe, feels self-conscious when she is recognised by members of the public and would pursue a career as a singer or equestrian if she was not destined to be queen

Biographer Claudia de Breij, pictured with the princess, reveals Amalia had a part-time job at a beachside cafe, feels self-conscious when she is recognised by members of the public and would pursue a career as a singer or equestrian if she was not destined to be queen

It reveals Amalia, who excelled as a student at Christelijk Gymnasium Sorghvliet, in The Hague, juggled her studies with a part-time job as a waitress at a beachside cafe where she was given the nickname ‘cocktail queen’.

She now hopes to spend a year working at a ‘multinational organisation’ before potentially pursuing a degree at the prestigious Leiden University. 

Amalia also said she feels self-conscious when she is recognised while out in public, adding: ‘Everyone looks at you like you have a goldfish on your head.’ 

While the House of Orange remains popular with the majority of Dutch people, the monarchy has come under increasing criticism in recent years. Of the possibility republicans could abolish it, Amalia said she could accept that.

‘They can do that of course, and then I’ll go on living too.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk