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The Project’s Waleed Aly finds Boxing Day sales bizarre 

‘I don’t quite understand it’: The Project’s Waleed Aly says he finds the concept of Boxing Day sales bizarre

It’s the annual day that sees many Australians flocking to shopping centres to fork out wads of cash for discounted items.

And on Wednesday’s The Project, Waleed Aly said he found the concept of Boxing Day sales to be bizarre.

‘I don’t quite understand it,’ the 40-year-old told co-hosts Gorgi Coghlan and Dave Thornton, as he asked them to explain it.

‘I don’t quite understand it’: The Project’s Waleed Aly [left], 40, said on Wednesday’s program that he finds the concept of Boxing Day sales to be bizarre. Co-host Gorgi Coghlan, 43, is pictured on the right 

After an opening segment that saw footage of Boxing Day shoppers in Sydney= frantically scouring items for purchase, Waleed shared his puzzlement.

‘I don’t quite understand this though because as I understand it with the Christmas festival, there’s a lot of spending in the lead-up to said festival, so aren’t people sick of spending money by the time Boxing Day arrives?’ he said.

‘Why are so many people out there doing this?’ Waleed added.  

Co-host Gorgi, 43, remarked that some buyers are keen to use their vouchers gifted to them on Christmas Day.

Talking point: After Waleed asked why people were rushing to the shops on Boxing Day, co-host Dave Thornton [left], 39, said that his partner had gone to the sales earlier on in the day in search of a new bed 

Talking point: After Waleed asked why people were rushing to the shops on Boxing Day, co-host Dave Thornton [left], 39, said that his partner had gone to the sales earlier on in the day in search of a new bed 

While comedian Dave, 39, who was filling in on the show, said that his partner had gone to the sales earlier on in the day in search of a new bed. 

Boxing Day originated in the United Kingdom, and has been adopted by a number of other countries that either remain, or were formerly connected, to the British Empire.

The day is currently celebrated in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Canada, as well as a few European countries. 

It was originally celebrated as a day in which employers would gift valuable items to their employees to take home, and has since seen the rise of the Boxing Day sales.     

Boxing Day is now one of the most lucrative events in the Australian calendar year.

It’s believed that 10 million shoppers will swipe, sign and tap their way through December 26 with a collection of new purchases totalling $3.6 billion nationwide.

Lucrative: It's believed that 10 million Australian shoppers will swipe, sign and tap their way through December 26 with a collection of new purchases totalling $3.6 billion nationwide 

Lucrative: It’s believed that 10 million Australian shoppers will swipe, sign and tap their way through December 26 with a collection of new purchases totalling $3.6 billion nationwide 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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