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Thomas Cook crew work bring home holidaymakers and are rewarded by ‘bloody generous’ collection

Thomas Cook crew work for nothing to bring home stranded holidaymakers and are rewarded by impromptu standing ovation and a ‘bloody generous’ collection ‘for their trouble’

  • Michelle Jubb posted images of emotional crew members landing in Bristol
  • The attendants wore their Thomas Cook uniforms despite losing their jobs
  • The passengers organised a ‘bloody generous’ whip-around to thank them 

Thomas Cook cabin crew who volunteered to bring stranded holidaymakers home were pictured crying after being rewarded with a ‘bloody generous’ whip-around.

Michelle Jubb posted images of the emotional crew members as they landed in Bristol two days after the travel giant collapsed – leaving 150,000 Britons abroad.

One of the flight attendants, dressed in her uniform despite losing her job on Monday, read a welcome message from her phone as she fought back tears.

Michelle Jubb (right) posted images of the emotional crew members (left) as they landed in Bristol two days after the travel giant collapsed – leaving 150,000 Britons abroad

When the plane landed in Bristol Airport on Wednesday the passengers, who had been on holiday in Larnaca, Cyprus, thanked the crew with a standing ovation.  

And passengers organised a ‘bloody generous’ whip-around after the crew worked for free and found tea and coffee to offer passengers in lieu of a trolley service.

‘Last night our repatriation flight was a Thomas Cook aeroplane, with Thomas Cook cabin crew, dressed in their uniform, smart and proud,’ Ms Jubb said. 

Posting a caption alongside images of the Thomas Cook plane and its tearful crew Ms Jubb said the passengers decided to give them ‘something for their trouble’. 

One of the flight attendants, dressed in her uniform despite losing her job on Monday, read a welcome message from her phone as she fought back tears

One of the flight attendants, dressed in her uniform despite losing her job on Monday, read a welcome message from her phone as she fought back tears

‘The only difference from normal was this crew were not being paid!! They had volunteered to bring people home,’ she added.

‘There was no food or trolley service, but they had managed to scrape together teabags and coffee so passenger could have a hot drink.

‘After a quick conversation with some other passengers we decided to do a collection for them, the passengers on the plane where so bloody generous, and the crew had something for their trouble.

Posting a caption alongside images of the Thomas Cook plane and its tearful crew Ms Jubb said the passengers decided to give them 'something for their trouble'

Posting a caption alongside images of the Thomas Cook plane and its tearful crew Ms Jubb said the passengers decided to give them ‘something for their trouble’

‘To the crew of ZT1155 on the 25th September – thank you.’

The Government and Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) have launched the ‘largest rescue mission since the Second World War’ following the collapse of Thomas Cook.

And five days later there are still 90,000 Britons trapped overseas in countries as far away as the Caribbean, Turkey and the US waiting to be brought back home.

Some 72 flights will bring 16,000 holidaymakers back today and 61,000 have already boarded planes and arrived back in the UK since the operation began.

When the plane (pictured) full of holidaymakers from Larnaca, Cyprus, landed at Bristol Airport on Wednesday, the crew were thanked with a standing ovation

When the plane (pictured) full of holidaymakers from Larnaca, Cyprus, landed at Bristol Airport on Wednesday, the crew were thanked with a standing ovation

Over the next month 25,000 people were due to fly to Majorca alone – offering a sense of the mammoth impact the travel group’s collapse will have on Britons. 

It comes after the Chief Executive Officer of Thomas Cook, Luke Powell, was forced to apologise when a ‘celebratory video’ of the firm’s German employees went viral.

Condor, the German airline owned by Thomas Cook, will continue flying after securing a €380m (£336m) bridging loan from the country’s government.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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