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Castle in Wales goes up for auction for offers over £600,000

A fairytale castle is going up for auction for just £600,000 – the price of a one-bed London flat.

The historic Gwrych Castle in Wales was built between 1812 and 1822 and sits within 160 acres of picturesque grounds.

It was sold in 2010 to property developers hoping to transform it into a £25m five-star country hotel with 75 bedrooms.

But the project fell through – and all that remains of the 200-year-old building is its six miles of walls.

Gwych castle in Wales was built between 1812 and 1822 and has just gone on the market for £600,000. It sits within a 160 acres of picturesque grounds on a hillside 

The historic structure was sold in 2010 to property developers hoping to transform it into a £25m five-star country hotel with 75 bedrooms

The historic structure was sold in 2010 to property developers hoping to transform it into a £25m five-star country hotel with 75 bedrooms

But the ambitious project to turn the castle into a hotel fell though  - and all that remains of the 200-year-old building is its six miles of walls

But the ambitious project to turn the castle into a hotel fell though  – and all that remains of the 200-year-old building is its six miles of walls

The castle once fit for a princess will now go to auction for offers over £600,000, which is less expensive than a one-bedroom house in London 

The castle once fit for a princess will now go to auction for offers over £600,000, which is less expensive than a one-bedroom house in London 

Thirty acres of the site is subject to a 25 year lease to the Trust and Natural Resource Wales. The Trust says it supports the castle going up for sale and hopes to buy it with the help of donors

Thirty acres of the site is subject to a 25 year lease to the Trust and Natural Resource Wales. The Trust says it supports the castle going up for sale and hopes to buy it with the help of donors

The castle once fit for a princess will now go to auction for offers over £600,000.

History lover Dr Mark Baker, 33, has been on a mission to save the castle after first visiting it as a youngster on his dad’s shoulders.

He wrote a book called the Rise and Fall of Gwrych Castle aged just 14 – and even met Tony Blair and Prince Charles after starting a campaign to save it.

Mark started Gwrych Castle Preservation Trust, a registered charity, and fundraised to restore the castle.

He now leads a team of volunteers to bring the 19th century castle in Angele, North Wales, back to life.

Thirty acres of the site is subject to a 25 year lease to the Trust and Natural Resource Wales.

The Trust says it supports the castle going up for sale and hopes to buy it with the help of donors.

A spokesman said: ‘Gwrych Castle Preservation Trust welcomes the opportunity presented by the decision of the current owners, EPM UK, to offer the Castle for sale.

History lover Dr Mark Baker, 33, has been on a mission to save the castle after first visiting it as a youngster on his dad's shoulders

Dr Mark Baker wrote a book called the Rise and Fall of Gwrych Castle aged just 14 - and even met Tony Blair and Prince Charles after starting a campaign to save it

History lover Dr Mark Baker, 33 (left), has been on a mission to save the castle after first visiting it as a youngster on his dad’s shoulders. Right: Inside the castle 

Gwrych Castle was built by Lloyd Hesketh Bamford-Hesketh as a memorial to his mother's ancestors, the Lloyds of Gwrych.

Gwrych Castle was built by Lloyd Hesketh Bamford-Hesketh as a memorial to his mother’s ancestors, the Lloyds of Gwrych.

A team of volunteers are determined to bring the historic castle back to life and are being led by Dr Mark Foster 

The castle is being offered for sale with Pugh Auctions at the AJ Bell Stadium in Manchester, on April 17

The castle is being offered for sale with Pugh Auctions at the AJ Bell Stadium in Manchester, on April 17

The Trust will restore outbuildings and the visitors centre to operational use and also restore the formal gardens under the 25 year lease

A spokesman for the Trust and Natural Resource Wales. said: 'Gwrych Castle Preservation Trust welcomes the opportunity presented by the decision of the current owners, EPM UK, to offer the Castle for sale'

The Trust will restore outbuildings and the visitors centre to operational use and also restore the formal gardens under the 25 year lease

For the past 21 years, the Trust has been campaigning to secure the future of Gwrych Castle and has successfully restored five acres of gardens and buildings under a 25 year lease

For the past 21 years, the Trust has been campaigning to secure the future of Gwrych Castle and has successfully restored five acres of gardens and buildings under a 25 year lease

The Trust is now in advanced discussions with the current owners; and with private donors and funders to seek the support we will need to secure the ownership of the Castle

The Trust is now in advanced discussions with the current owners; and with private donors and funders to seek the support we will need to secure the ownership of the Castle

‘This is an exciting opportunity for the Trust to fulfill its long-term ambition to purchase the Castle and to restore and safeguard it for the nation.

‘For the past 21 years, the Trust has been campaigning to secure the future of Gwrych Castle and has successfully restored five acres of gardens and buildings under a 25 year lease.

‘The Trust is now in advanced discussions with the current owners; and with private donors and funders to seek the support we will need to secure the ownership of the Castle.

‘The Trust recognises the generosity of the public so far and welcomes all expressions of support and contributions to our funds to enable us to swiftly conclude the purchase of the Castle and subsequently to restore it to its historic glory.’

The Trust will restore outbuildings and the visitors centre to operational use and also restore the formal gardens under the 25 year lease.

Inside the castle - which could do with a little more than just a lick of paint. Winifred Bamford-Hesketh, later Countess of Dundonald, inherited it in 1894. She died in 1924 and her will declared Gwrych should be bequeathed to King George V so the Royal Family had a permanent base in Wales

Inside the castle – which could do with a little more than just a lick of paint. Winifred Bamford-Hesketh, later Countess of Dundonald, inherited it in 1894. She died in 1924 and her will declared Gwrych should be bequeathed to King George V so the Royal Family had a permanent base in Wales

Winifred Bamfrod-Hesketh's request was declined and it was given to St John of Jerusalem

Winifred Bamfrod-Hesketh’s request was declined and it was given to St John of Jerusalem

In 1925 the Earl of Dundonald, Winifred's husband, bought back the castle for £78,000 and during World War II Gwrych housed Jewish refugees

In 1925 the Earl of Dundonald, Winifred’s husband, bought back the castle for £78,000 and during World War II Gwrych housed Jewish refugees

Sad site: Much of the interior has fallen into a state of disrepair and needs extensive repair and renovation work carrying out 

Sad site: Much of the interior has fallen into a state of disrepair and needs extensive repair and renovation work carrying out 

A gradual decline began when Gwrych Castle finally left the family's hands in 1946

A gradual decline began when Gwrych Castle finally left the family’s hands in 1946

The castle is being offered for sale with Pugh Auctions at the AJ Bell Stadium in Manchester, on April 17.

Gwrych Castle was built by Lloyd Hesketh Bamford-Hesketh as a memorial to his mother’s ancestors, the Lloyds of Gwrych.

Winifred Bamford-Hesketh, later Countess of Dundonald, inherited it in 1894.

She died in 1924 and her will declared Gwrych should be bequeathed to King George V so the Royal Family had a permanent base in Wales.

This request was declined and it was given to St John of Jerusalem.

In 1925 the Earl of Dundonald, Winifred’s husband, bought back the castle for £78,000 and during World War II Gwrych housed Jewish refugees.

A gradual decline began when Gwrych Castle finally left the family’s hands in 1946. 



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