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Dukes of Hazzard stars address controversy over Confederate flag on show’s iconic General Lee car

‘The car is innocent’: Dukes of Hazzard stars say ‘the politically correct generation has gotten way out of hand’ after controversy over the Confederate flag on the show’s iconic General Lee car

  • Dukes of Hazzard co-stars John Schneider and Tom Wopat have addressed the long-time controversy over the show’s iconic General Lee car
  • Both came forward as protests have mounted over the Confederate flag that the 1969 Dodge Charger features prominently on its roof
  • The stars defended use of the flag, considered a symbol of racism in the US, by the hit action and comedy show about cousins Bo and Luke Duke
  • The program about the former moonshiners who live in rural Georgia was a top rated show that ran from 1979 to 1985
  • Despite its success, the Dukes of Hazzard never sat well with critics over its use of stereotypes and has stopped airing on broadcast TV
  • The show is currently only available for viewing on Amazon’s Prime streaming platform

Dukes of Hazzard co-stars John Schneider and Tom Wopat addressed the long-time controversy over the show’s iconic General Lee car, saying political correctness has gone too far as protests mount over the Confederate flag that the famed vehicle features prominently on its roof. 

Both stars defended the customized 1969 Dodge Charger used in the hit action and comedy show about cousins Bo and Luke Duke, former moonshiners who live in rural Georgia. 

The car, named after Confederate General Robert E. Lee, has enjoyed its own popularity as much as the actors, becoming a crowd pleaser at fan and collectors conventions. 

‘I have never had an African American come up to me and have any problem with it whatsoever,’  Schneider, 60, who played Bo on the program told the Hollywood Reporter. ‘The whole politically correct generation has gotten way out of hand.’  

Dukes of Hazzard co-stars John Schneider and Tom Wopat (left to right) addressed the long-time controversy over the show’s iconic General Lee car, saying political correctness has gone too far as protests mount over the Confederate flag on the vehicle’s roof 

Schneider, 60, who played Bo on the Dukes of Hazzard, defended the customized 1969 Dodge Charger used by the hit action and comedy show

Wopat, 68, who played Luke on the program, also came to the defense of the iconic car, named after Confederate General Robert E. Lee

Schneider (left) and Wopat (right) defended the customized 1969 Dodge Charger used by the hit action and comedy show about cousins Bo and Luke Duke, former moonshiners who live in rural Georgia

Wopat, 68, who played Luke, took a slightly opposing view of the controversy. 

‘The situation in the country has obviously changed in the last 40 years. I feel fortunate to be living in a time when we can address some of the injustices of the past,’ he said.

But Wopat also insisted, ‘the car is innocent’. 

Dukes of Hazzard, which ran from 1979 to 1985 and drew millions of viewers per episode, never sat well with critics over its use of stereotypes. Still, it has had its fans both during its original run and later in repeats.  

Despite its success, the show has stopped airing on broadcast TV and currently is only available for on Amazon’s Prime streaming platform, which may remove the show in response to the controversy.  

Controversy over Confederate flags has grown in the wake of protests that erupted after the police-related slaying of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

The car, named after Confederate General Robert E. Lee, has enjoyed its own popularity as much as the actors, becoming a crowd pleaser at fan and collectors conventions

The car, named after Confederate General Robert E. Lee, has enjoyed its own popularity as much as the actors, becoming a crowd pleaser at fan and collectors conventions

Despite its success, the show has stopped airing on broadcast TV and currently is only available for on Amazon's Prime streaming platform. Wopat and Schneider are pictured with co-star Catherine Bach in a publicity still from the show

Despite its success, the show has stopped airing on broadcast TV and currently is only available for on Amazon’s Prime streaming platform. Wopat and Schneider are pictured with co-star Catherine Bach in a publicity still from the show

Floyd, a 46-year-old black father, died after white police officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee on his neck for almost nine minutes during an arrest on Memorial Day.

Video taken by a bystander of the slaying went viral and sparked Black Lives Matter protests calling for an end to police brutality and systematic racism.

That led to NASCAR abandoning its use of the Confederate flag, which had been a staple at the national race car circuit.   

Confederate statues and monuments have also been toppled by protesters, or in some cases removed by local officials.  

Black Lives Matter protests have erupted across the country after the police-related slaying of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Pictured above a July 4 protest in New Orleans

Black Lives Matter protests have erupted across the country after the police-related slaying of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Pictured above a July 4 protest in New Orleans

Show creator Gy Waldron told the Hollywood Reporter he recalled seeing Confederate flags throughout his childhood growing up in Lenoxburg, Kentucky.

‘I had relatives fight on both sides of the Civil War and we honored both the American and Confederate flags,’ Waldron, 87, said. 

‘No one even connected the Confederate flag with slavery. It was simply a part of our Southern culture.’

However, Waldron also said he ‘wholeheartedly’ supports the Black Lives Matter movement and its ‘quest to address racism around the world’.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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