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Ex-Afghan translators’ wives begin legal action to live in Britain with their husbands

Wives of ex-Afghan translators begin legal action against the Government to let them join their husbands in Britain as they fear Taliban revenge attacks

  • UK and US forces are due to pull out from Afghanistan by September 11
  • A dozen women’s husbands – who were interpreters for UK military – were engaged to wed them when they were granted sanctuary in Britain
  • They have since returned to marry in Afghanistan – but their attempts to bring their wives to the UK with them have been rejected
  • As translators were not married when they moved to Britain, their wives must apply under normal immigration and asylum rules 

The wives of Afghan former translators have begun legal action against the Government to allow them to join their husbands in Britain.

A dozen women fear being left to face Taliban revenge attacks – with UK and US forces due to pull out from Afghanistan by September 11.

Their husbands, who were interpreters for the UK military, were engaged to wed them when they were granted sanctuary in Britain.

They have since returned to marry in Afghanistan – but their attempts to bring their wives to the UK with them have been rejected. 

The wives of Afghan former translators have begun legal action against the Government to allow them to join their husbands in the UK. (Above, file image, the interpreters stood shoulder-to-shoulder with British troops)

As the translators were not married when they moved to Britain, their wives must apply under normal immigration and asylum rules – one requirement being they speak English.

Interpreters accused the Government of ‘betrayal’, claiming their wives are suffering from depression. 

Now lawyers for the women told the Home Office they will seek a judicial review of the decision, highlighting the risk they face from the Taliban and their denial of the right to a family life.

The Mail’s Betrayal of the Brave campaign has highlighted the plight of translators. 

The Sulha Alliance for the interpreters said: ‘These families should be urgently reunited to protect wives and children against revenge.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk