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Pauline Hanson says Aboriginal people have a ‘chip on their shoulder’ over Australia Day

‘Get rid of your chip off your shoulder’: Pauline Hanson’s Australia Day message to Aboriginals to get over changing the date

  • Pauline Hanson has said Australia Day protesters have ‘a chip on their shoulder’
  • The federal senator was involved in heated debate with radio host Neil Mitchell
  • Ms Hanson, 65, claimed date of Australia Day is not a big issue for Aborigines
  • Her comments followed protests across Australia over the January 26th date
  • Marking arrival of the First Fleet in Sydney Harbour, it is seen as ‘invasion day’

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has claimed Aboriginal people who want Australia Day moved away from January 26 need to ‘get the chip off their shoulder’. 

The outspoken federal senator was involved with a heated argument with Melbourne radio broadcaster Neil Mitchell on the Today Show, a day after Australia Day protests across the country.

Aboriginal and Torres Straight Island flags filled streets across the nation on Sunday, as thousands of protesters called for the date of Australia Day to be moved because of growing tensions over what it celebrates.

January 26 – which marks the raising of the British flag on Australian soil in 1788 after the First Fleet arrived in Sydney Harbour – is regarded as ‘invasion day’ by many First Nations people.

During a passionate discussion with Mr Mitchell and host Karl Stefanovic, Ms Hanson said she does not believe the date should be changed – claiming there are far bigger issues for Aboriginal communities.

 

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson (pictured) claims Aboriginal people who want Australia Day moved away from January 26 need to ‘get the chip off their shoulder’

‘They’re not talking about this in Aboriginal communities and I was there two weeks ago,’ Ms Hanson, 65, said. 

‘You know the big issues there? Kids are on the streets, they’re starving, they’ve got the biggest rate of syphilis in their townships.

‘You move the date from January 26th, whatever date you pick they’re going to whinge about that as well.

‘Get rid of the chip off your bloody shoulder. We are here, I was born here, this is my country… this is Australia Day where people join together.’ 

Mr Mitchell, the long-time 3AW talkback host, initially agreed that the date on which Australia Day is celebrated is not ‘a huge issue for most Aboriginal people’.

But he took exception to Ms Hanson’s comments that ‘invasion day’ protesters have a chip on their shoulder, claiming it was remarks like this that caused division.

Thousands of protesters called for the date of Australia Day to be moved because of growing tensions over what it celebrates

Thousands of protesters called for the date of Australia Day to be moved because of growing tensions over what it celebrates

January 26 - which marks the raising of the British flag on Australian soil in 1788 after the First Fleet arrived in Sydney Harbour - is regarded as 'invasion day' by many First Nations people

January 26 – which marks the raising of the British flag on Australian soil in 1788 after the First Fleet arrived in Sydney Harbour – is regarded as ‘invasion day’ by many First Nations people

Aboriginal and Torres Straight Island flags filled streets across the nation on Sunday as part of the protests

Aboriginal and Torres Straight Island flags filled streets across the nation on Sunday as part of the protests

‘Get the chip off your shoulder? That’ll really help. We need to be inclusive. I don’t think it’s a chip on your shoulder to be worried about history,’ Mr Mitchell, 68, said.

Ms Hanson defended her stance, replying: ‘Neil this has been going on for over 200 years do you think they have been affected by this?’

‘They’re using this as an excuse. It’s either a political stance or they’re pushing their own agenda.’

Today Show host Karl Stefanovic had the final say on the matter, claiming that such a debate highlighted how emotional the issue is.

‘This is part of the problem, it is such a divisive thing and a divisive argument, and I want unification on this day,’ he said.



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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