News, Culture & Society

Police KNEW a Wayne Couzens was accused of flashing but failed to identify him as a Met officer

A McDonald’s worker who was flashed by Wayne Couzens today blasted police for ‘not acting quickly enough’ after they were handed CCTV of him at the drive-thru three days before Sarah Everard’s murder – as it emerged officers knew his name but failed to identify him as one of their officers until after the tragedy.  

The woman, who did not want to be named, said that two incidents of Couzens exposing himself took place in February as he arrived in his car late at night at a drive-thru on the A20 near Swanley in Kent with his trousers down. Police were told of the allegations on February 28 although the incidents took place earlier that month. 

Speaking exclusively to MailOnline, she fumed: ‘The police took our statements and took away CCTV. If they had taken this more seriously, they could easily have figured out that he was a policeman who had committed these crimes. The police had three days to stop him but didn’t. It could have stopped him from doing a lot worse.’

Previously it was known the incidents had been reported to police, but the fact officers knew his name but did not realise he was a serving Met policeman – which MailOnline can reveal today – will be seen as fresh evidence he could have been exposed as a sexual predator before he went on to kidnap, rape and strangle the 33-year-old. 

Address searches show there are very few people sharing the killer’s name in the country, and even fewer in London and the South East – meaning a basic investigation would have identified the Diplomatic Protection Officer as the suspect. 

Had detectives understood the full picture at the time, it is likely Couzens would have been suspended. Officers are then usually put on restricted duties, which means they must hand in their warrant card and cannot have any contact with the public. 

To carry out his horrific crime, the fiend showed Miss Everard his warrant card to force her into his car as part of a fake Covid arrest. He then used his Met-issued equipment to handcuff the marketing executive before strangling her with his police belt.

The Met said the McDonald’s allegations were ‘allocated for investigation’ but ‘by the time of Sarah’s abduction it was not concluded’. It referred itself to the Independent Office of Police Conduct, which is investigating the force’s alleged failure to investigate. 

Today’s revelation will heap yet more pressure on beleaguered Met commissioner Cressida Dick – who has been facing demands to resign over the multiple missed chances to expose Couzens as a threat to women before he was able to finally fulfill his sick fantasy.

As the Met and its Commissioner faced yet another crisis, it also emerged today –  

  • Furious MPs are demanding an independent inquiry into Miss Everard’s murder amid anger at ‘deeply insulting’ Met Police guidance telling women to ‘wave down a bus’ if they don’t trust a male officer; 
  • Met detectives are actively investigating if killer cop Wayne Couzens is connected to any further historic crimes;
  • Couzens exchanged misogynistic, racist and homophobic texts with his police colleagues who are now facing a criminal investigation. 16 officers are being probed;
  • Met chief Cressida Dick still faces a clamour to resign after she admitted Sarah Everard’s murder had corroded trust in the police and brought ‘shame’ on her force’.

Couzens in a court sketch today

Police knew a Wayne Couzens (left, in his uniform with his police belt circled; and right, in a court sketch) was accused of flashing two women at a McDonald’s, with police hearing about the allegation three days before he raped and murdered Sarah Everard. However, officers failed to make the link with him being a police officer

To carry out his horrific crime, Couzens showed Miss Everard his warrant card to force her into his car as part of a fake Covid arrest

To carry out his horrific crime, Couzens showed Miss Everard his warrant card to force her into his car as part of a fake Covid arrest 

Staff at the Swanley McDonald’s told police on February 28 that two female members of staff had been flashed by a motorist who exposed himself on February 7 and again on February 27. 

Last night, an official statement said the crimes had been ‘allocated for investigation’ by the time of Miss Everard’s abduction but it was not concluded. It added that the case remained a ‘live criminal inquiry’.

The Met is being investigated by the Independent Office of Police Conduct (IOPC) over how it handled the case. In last night’s statement, it said officers’ approach to indecent exposure reports was being ‘re-evaluated’.  

The female McDonald’s worker said the first incident occurred when Couzens bought a coffee and a Big Mac with fries at the drive-thru. When she looked down from the serving hatch, the woman saw that he was not wearing any trousers.

The woman revealed that she informed management immediately that night but was left so disturbed that she did not take down any details of his vehicle and was only able to provide a brief description of him, as he was wearing a mask.

The next time Couzens allegedly exposed himself to another female McDonald’s worker who was aged around 18. She managed to note down the registration number of the killer cop’s car and the make and model, prompting management to inform police shortly afterwards, it is claimed. 

Multiple chances police missed to identify Couzens as sexual predator 

1 –  On February 28, two McDonald’s staff told police they were flashed by a male motorist at a branch in Swanley, Kent. Officers are then believed to have identified Couzens’ car via CCTV of his number plate. However, officers did not realise the suspect was their own officer until afterwards.  

– Couzens’ car number plate was linked to the 2015 indecent exposure but Met Police blamed the Kent force, claiming ‘Kent Police investigated this allegation and decided to take no further action. Our review found that the record of this allegation and outcome may not have been found during the vetting checks.’

HOW DID COP NICKNAMED ‘THE RAPIST’ PASS VETTING FOR ELITE MET ARMED UNIT? 

The Met is also facing questions about how its vetting process failed to pick up concerns around Couzens before he was made an armed officer in its elite Diplomatic Protection Group, which involved him guarding embassies, VIPs and members of the Royal Family. There were numerous clues about Couzens’ bad character, including: 

  • Couzens used to work at his father’s garage in Dover before joining the Kent Special Constabulary at some point after 2002. The court heard a colleague in that year spoke of ‘his attraction to brutal sexual pornography’ but Jim Sturman QC, defending, said it related to a single incident ‘which is almost impossible to examine now’; 
  • He allegedly nicknamed ‘The Rapist’ by colleagues in the Civil Nuclear Constabulary – where he was involved in protecting nuclear power stations – because of his inappropriate behaviour around women;
  • He used prostitutes and had a fake Match.com dating profile despite being married with two children, his trial heard; 
  • In 2018, it has been claimed that he was reported to bosses for slapping a female police officer’s bottom at Bromley police station but it appears no action was taken, a source claimed;
  • While at Bromley, it is also alleged he became the subject of gossip for only stopping female motorists – before taking their details so he could watch their homes – and parking outside schools to leer at mothers and sixth formers;
  • The Met said: ‘Couzens was a serving and vetted police officer when he joined the Met. He had no criminal convictions or cautions and he was not subject to any misconduct proceedings during his time at the Met. We are not aware of any other concerns raised by his colleagues, or anyone else, regarding his behaviour prior to him joining the Met or since.’

Couzens is said to have visited the McDonald’s in his blue Seat car, which he used to carry Everard to her death in Kent.

She was initially abducted in south London on March 3 in another car he hired for the crime before transferring her to the Seat, which he had deliberately left in an isolated location in Dover.

After being informed of the two indecent exposure incidents by McDonald’s management, officers arrived at the Swanley branch on February 28, where they interviewed both women, some of their colleagues and were also provided with CCTV footage.

The woman added: ‘The officers came to the MacDonald’s sat us down and we gave them all the details about what happened. They went away with a lot of evidence and CCTV.

‘If you ask me, they had good information to go on. But I don’t think any of us expected the case would escalate so quickly and that Sarah would be murdered just a few days later.’

The woman said she only realised that it was Couzens who had exposed himself to her following his arrest when she saw a picture of his blue Seat car in the media and another of him holding a drink.

She recalled: ‘I saw the blue car and there was a picture of him with a drink. He had very specific hands and I joined the dots and realised that it was him. It sent a cold shiver through me.

‘He had very distinctive, heavy hands, they were like clubs. I noticed them when I handed him the coffee at the drive thru and when I saw them in the picture, I knew it was the same man who had exposed himself to me.’

Recalling the moment Couzens allegedly exposed himself to her, the woman said: ‘The whole thing left me quite disturbed. He casually pulled up to the serving hatch having ordered his food and I could clearly see that he was naked from below the waist.

‘I’m glad that I reported him. I wanted to show my younger female colleagues that this behaviour is not acceptable, and women should not have to put up with it.’

The woman, who is a devout Christian, revealed that following Couzens arrest, she had been told that he had exposed himself to other women working at businesses in the Kent area.

She added: ‘It was not the first time that he had done this when he came to McDonald’s and I’ve since heard that he’d done it at other places too.

‘I’m glad I took a stand and alerted the authorities because it was the right thing do. But I never imagined that he would go on to murder a woman, it’s tragic.’

The woman claimed that since providing a statement to police on February 28 and Couzens subsequent arrest, she has not been contacted by officers.

The IOPC is also looking into Kent Police – where Couzens used to work as a volunteer – after it was accused of not investigating reports in 2015 that a man had been spotted driving down a road with no trousers on.

Met Police admitted ‘one of a range of checks’ when Couzens applied to join the force ‘may not have been undertaken correctly’.

ouzens’ car number plate was linked to the 2015 indecent exposure but Met Police blamed the Kent force, claiming ‘Kent Police investigated this allegation and decided to take no further action. Our review found that the record of this allegation and outcome may not have been found during the vetting checks.’

Couzens has been linked to two reports of incident exposure at this McDonald's drive-thru in Swanley, Kent

Couzens has been linked to two reports of incident exposure at this McDonald’s drive-thru in Swanley, Kent  

It came as fresh details of Couzens’ sexual perversion continued to emerge today – as the Met revealed a new strategy to counter violence against women.

Reports said Couzens exchanged misogynistic, racist and homophobic texts with police colleagues who are now facing a criminal investigation.

Five serving officers, three of whom work for the Metropolitan Police, and one former officer, allegedly shared horrific content with Sarah Everard’s killer on a WhatsApp group in the months before the murder.

After his arrest in March, detectives found the ‘vile’ texts on his phone which the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IOPC) said were of a ‘discriminatory and/or inappropriate nature’.

Aside from the three serving officers working for the Met, one under investigation is from the Civil Nuclear Constabulary and another works for Norfolk Constabulary, according to The Times.

The former officer in the group also previously worked for the Met, prompting yet more calls for Dame Cressida to go.

And when Sue Fish, a former chief constable of Nottinghamshire, was asked on Times Radio if she believed the police force was institutionally misogynistic, she replied: ‘Yes, I do. And that’s not just the Metropolitan Police, that’s policing, structurally, across the country.’ 

This is the moment Couzens staged his fake arrest to lure Miss Everard into being handcuffed and put in the back of his car. Women are now being urged to 'hail a bus' or 'run'

This is the moment Couzens staged his fake arrest to lure Miss Everard into being handcuffed and put in the back of his car. Women are now being urged to ‘hail a bus’ or ‘run’

Furious MPs demand independent inquiry into murder of Sarah Everard amid anger at ‘deeply insulting’ Met Police guidance telling women to ‘wave down a BUS’ if they don’t trust a male officer – as ex-commissioner slams ‘extraordinary blunders’

By Martin Robinson, Chief Reporter for MailOnline

The Met has vowed to make women safer after Miss Everard's (pictured) by a serving officer - but women say the new strategy is 'deeply insulting'

The Met has vowed to make women safer after Miss Everard’s (pictured) by a serving officer – but women say the new strategy is ‘deeply insulting’ 

MPs today called for an independent inquiry into the murder of Sarah Everard and how the Metropolitan Police failed to root out Wayne Couzens – a serving armed officer who would go on to abduct and kill the marketing executive using his warrant card and cuffs.

Scotland Yard was today accused of pouring scorn on frightened women in the wake of Sarah Everard’s murder after the force’s new ‘deeply insulting’ and ‘derisory’ strategy urged them to ‘wave down a bus’ if they fear being abducted by police.

Its ‘tone deaf’ advice also urges women to ‘run into a house’, ‘shout out to a passer-by’ or call 999 if they don’t trust a policeman who has stopped them. 

The Met’s advise to flag down a bus has caused particular anger – with Labour calling on Priti Patel to call an independent Home Office inquiry into violence against women and girls by Met Police officers and staff. 

The inquiry would look at Sarah’s murder and Couzens use of his powers to kidnap her  – but also cases involving police officers and staff who attacked women as well as the 10 murders of women in capital in the past year including Sabina Nessa in Kidbrooke a fortnight ago and sisters Nicole Smallman and Bibaa Henry in last year. Officers guarding the crime scene shared selfies with their bodies.  

Today former Met Commissioner Lord Stevens said there had been ‘extraordinary blunders’ in the run up to Sarah’s murder and the forces’ vetting system is not ‘fit for purpose’ because he slipped through the net and went go on to commit the appalling crimes. 

He said: ‘The fact that this individual in 2015 was seen to be driving around without any clothes on from his waist downwards, the fact he was called a rapist, the fact that he was a really strange individual, I mean there is no way that that man should have been given a gun. A proper vetting process, the vetting process is obviously not fit for the purpose and this needs all to be changed, it’s an extraordinary story of blunders and of that there’s no doubt’. 

Jess Phillips, Labour’s shadow minister for domestic violence and safeguarding, said the advice is ‘tone deaf’, adding she ‘would have got in the car and almost anybody would have got in the car’ and ‘the onus is on the Metropolitan Police to do better’.

Shadow cabinet member Wes Streeting said: ‘Apparently bus drivers should stop if someone is waving them down in the street away from a bus stop, just in case, because that’s a better answer than the Met getting their act together?! Utterly woeful’. 

Prison Service will ‘have a hard time’ protecting Wayne Couzens who is ‘going to wish they hanged him’ with ‘every prisoner in Britain queueing up to make a name for themselves’ 

The Prison Service will ‘have a hard time’ protecting Sarah Everard’s killer Wayne Couzens who will soon wish he had been hanged instead, it was claimed today.

Couzens will die behind bars after he was sentenced yesterday for kidnapping, raping and murdering the marketing executive from South London in March.

Insiders said ‘every prisoner in the country is going to want to a pop at’ Couzens, who has initially been sent to HMP Belmarsh in Thamesmead, South East London.

He will undergo an assessment at the Category A jail before joining the ‘dispersal system’ of five top-security jails from which inmates are moved without warning. 

These are Frankland in County Durham, Full Sutton in North Yorkshire, Long Lartin in Worcestershire, Wakefield in West Yorkshire and Whitemoor in Cambridgeshire.

A Prison Service source told The Times: ‘They are going to have a hard time protecting him. Every prisoner in the country is going to want to a pop at him.’  

As another crisis engulfed the Met, Policing minister Kit Malthouse admitted the case had struck a ‘devastating blow to the confidence that people have in police officers’, and he warned thousands of officers will need to do more so trust can be rebuilt. 

Women in London have said that they would now run away if faced with a lone officer after Wayne Couzens staged an arrest using lockdown laws to abduct, rape and murder Sarah on March 3.

One said she would be ‘scared, frightened and try to get away from them because I wouldn’t trust any policeman again after what happened to Sarah’. Another said: ‘If it happened to me I’d be so worried I’d just get into my car and drive’.

It came as Dame Cressida Dick came under more pressure to resign over the scandal – and to fix the force’s toxic culture – after it emerged Couzens exchanged misogynistic, racist and homophobic texts with his police colleagues. Former Commissioner Lord Stevens said today there had been ‘extraordinary blunders’ before Couzens struck and the case showed the Met’s vetting system is not ‘fit for purpose’. 

Dame Cressida said yesterday she was ‘sorry’ and ‘sickened’ at how Couzens was able to abuse his position but refused to quit as female officers claimed they were afraid to report their male colleagues for misconduct because they ‘close ranks’ and could abandon them on calls where they would have their ‘heads kicked in’ while waiting for backup.

Since March 2020 when Sarah Everard, 33, was murdered by Met Police officer Wayne Couzens, 48, some 77 women have been killed, according to Rape Crisis. Two weeks ago, primary school teacher Sabina Nessa, 28, was found dead in a park also in south London, described in court as a ‘predatory’ murder.

Legal experts have predicted that bus drivers stopping for women could get arrested themselves.

Lawyer and commentator David Green said: ‘Imagine the scenes of a person challenging what may be a lawful arrest by stopping a bus and getting the bus driver involved.

‘It would probably end up with the hapless bus driver being arrested as well.

‘One gets the sense that the writer of this police statement had, by the end of it, ran out of ideas and was winging it like an unprepared student in the last half-hour of an examination.

‘But even the other advice in the statement is unrealistic and misconceived.

‘Anyone challenging arrest can say hello to the offence of resisting or wilfully obstructing a constable in the execution of their duty. They may also say hello to Mr Taser.’ 

As part if its new strategy, the Met has pledged to deploy 650 new officers and increase patrols to do more to protect women and girls in the wake of Sarah Everard’s murder by Couzens – but critics questioned why they weren’t doing that already. 

And anyone stopped on the street is encouraged to call 999 or use the officer’s radio to confirm their warrant card is genuine – but many have pointed out that many not have stopped Couzens kidnapping Sarah because his warrant card and number was genuine.

Even Sir Stephen House, the Met’s deputy commissioner, admitted yesterday that warrant cards may not be enough for officers to prove their identity in future.  

Couzens lapped West and South-West London looking for a woman to snatch, rape and murder before finding Miss Everard

Couzens lapped West and South-West London looking for a woman to snatch, rape and murder before finding Miss Everard

‘Hail a bus, shout for help or run away’: The Met’s advice to women if they don’t trust a police officer

The under-fire Met Police has revealed a new ‘strategy’ to protect women after Sarah Everard’s horrific killing, including banning lone plain-clothed officers from operating alone, increasing patrols in ‘hotspot’ areas, and reviewing how they investigate reports of indecent exposure.  

Last night, the Met revealed steps it believes will help reassure the public, as it admitted Miss Everard’s killing was part of a ‘much bigger and troubling picture’ of women being killed in the streets. The new strategy includes:  

Plain-clothed officers banned from going out on their own and public are told to challenge them 

Plain clothes officers will not be deployed on their own and will be ‘in pairs’, Deputy Commissioner Sir Stephen House said, but he warned there will be occasions where that is not possible given that off-duty officers not in uniform ‘put themselves on duty’ when they come across an incident.

As Couzens kidnapped Ms Everard by carrying out a false arrest with his warrant card, the Met have also issued advice to anyone who is concerned a police officer is not acting legitimately during an interaction. 

They recommend people ask where the officer’s colleagues are, where they have come from, why they are there, and exactly why they are stopping or talking to them.

They also suggest verifying the police officer by asking to hear their radio operator or asking to speak to the radio operator themselves.

‘All officers will, of course, know about this case and will be expecting in an interaction like that – rare as it may be – that members of the public may be understandably concerned and more distrusting than they previously would have been, and should and will expect to be asked more questions,’ the force said in a statement.

Other ‘searching questions’ the force recommended include, ‘Where are your colleagues?’, ‘Where have you come from?’, ‘Why are you here?’ and ‘Exactly why are you stopping or talking to me?’ 

Finally, the Met Police are advising people to shout out to a passer-by, run into a house, knock on a door, wave a bus down, or call 999. 

650 extra officers in busy public places and more patrols in ‘hotspots’ where women feel unsafe  

The force announced that 650 new officers will be deployed in public places to better protect women and girls in the wake of Miss Everard’s murder.

After stinging criticism over its handling of the case, the force vowed to increase patrols and publish a new strategy for tackling violence against women.

The strategy will outline how the Met will prioritise action against sexual and violent predatory offenders.

The force said it had also set up ‘predatory offender units’, which have arrested more than 2,000 suspects for domestic abuse, sex offences, and child abuse since November.

The 650 new officers will be sent into busy public places, including areas where women and girls ‘lack confidence that they are safe’, the Met said. 

The force will ‘step up’ patrols and provide an increased police presence in areas identified as hotspot locations for violence and harassment. 

It said: ‘The full horrific details of [Wayne Couzens’] crimes are deeply concerning and raise entirely legitimate questions.

‘This is the most horrific of crimes, but we recognise this is part of a much bigger and troubling picture.’

The spokesman said other recent murders ‘bring into sharp focus our urgent duty to do more to protect women and girls’. 

More attention for reports of indecent exposure after missed chances to stop Couzens 

Some 72 hours before the murder, staff at a drive-through McDonald’s restaurant in Swanley told police that two female staff members had been flashed by a motorist who exposed himself on February 7 and again on February 27.

But despite being given CCTV evidence and the number plate of Couzens’ car, detectives did not link the two incidents to the killer officer.

Had he been identified as a suspected sex offender, Couzens is likely to have been suspended and had his warrant card removed. 

Last night, the Met said the report was allocated for investigation but ‘it was not concluded’ by the time Miss Everard was abducted. 

The force vowed to ‘re-evaluate’ its approach to indecent exposure, which criminologists say is often an early sign of sexual deviancy that can manifest itself later in violence. 

The Met said: ‘We are reviewing our crime screening process in respect of indecent exposure. We want to better understand the information we have as part of our approach to the identification and policing of crime hotspots.

‘We believe this is an under-reported crime.

‘We do not underestimate how difficult it can be for people to talk about these offences but we would urge anyone who is the victim of this sort of offending to report it to us quickly so we can respond.

‘We are also focused on improving detections both for indecent exposure but for a broader range of offences committed mainly against women.’   

Review of vetting procedures after killer cop ‘slipped through the net’ 

The Met said a vetting check ‘may not have been carried out correctly’ on Couzens when he joined the force in 2018, linking him to another indecent exposure allegation in Kent in 2015.

The vetting did not flag up that a vehicle associated with Couzens had been identified in the Kent Police investigation.

The Met said: ‘Our review found that the record of this allegation and outcome may not have been found during the vetting checks.’

Despite this, the force still maintained that it had ‘no information available at the time’ that would have changed its decision to allow Couzens to serve. 

Last night, it said it had written to Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary, Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS), which is currently carrying out an inspection of the Met, to ask it to pay ‘particular attention’ to how officers are vetted. 

Sir Stephen House accepted the case has raised questions on recruitment and vetting, adding: ‘We know we have to work to rebuild trust and confidence, and we will do all we can to achieve that.’ 

Couzens transferred into the Met from the Civil Nuclear Constabulary (CNC) in September 2018. His first posting was to South Area, serving initially in a Safer Neighbourhood Team, before joining a response team covering the Bromley area in February 2019.

He then moved to the Parliamentary and Diplomatic Protection Command in February 2020 where his primary role was to patrol diplomatic premises, mainly embassies. 

… But off-duty officers will still be allowed to carry around police equipment 

Before the attack members of the public had noticed Couzens wearing his police belt when not on duty, with a pair of handcuffs and black pepper spray holder.

During the kidnap, he flashed his police ID to carry out a fake Covid arrest before cuffing Miss Everard in his car and strangling her with his police belt. 

Nonetheless, the force suggested banning officers from carrying any of their equipment while not on duty would be impractical.  

The force said: ‘The fact that he used equipment given to him by the Met is reprehensible and it compounds the dreadful nature of his crimes.

‘Nevertheless, it has to be the case that officers are able, on occasion, to take some or all of their equipment with them, between places of duty and where needed, travelling to and from work. 

‘They do not require explicit permission. It is a personal decision that has to be done for legitimate reasons and that they will have to justify if challenged.

Patsy Stevenson, who was arrested at the vigil for Sarah Everard in March, said the Metropolitan Police’s suggestions of knocking on a door or waving a bus down were ‘almost laughable if it wasn’t so disgusting’.

The force advised anyone who is concerned a police officer is not acting legitimately during an interaction to ask where the officer’s colleagues are; where they have come from; why they are there; and exactly why they are stopping or talking to them.

Anyone could verify the police officer by asking to hear their radio operator or asking to speak to the radio operator themselves, the force said, also suggesting that people who are concerned can shout out to a passer-by, run into a house, knock on a door, wave a bus down, or call 999.

Ms Stevenson told the PA news agency: ‘I feel like they are just clutching at straws, because the advice isn’t relevant. It’s like a distraction because, number one, in that situation, you can’t just stop and hail down a bus or a taxi or something.

‘Can you imagine the distrust that people have right now where they have to protect themselves from the police in that manner? That is shocking.’

She said if someone had done something illegal it is the police giving them permission to run off, adding: ‘It doesn’t make any sense. It’s like an irrelevant piece of advice. So I feel like it reads more like a distraction for them to seem like they’re dealing with the issue, because they could have been enacting change for ages now, but they haven’t, and they’re still not doing it, they’re just putting out a statement to quieten people down.’

The chairman of the Commons Justice Committee has said the Government should consider making misogyny a hate crime in the way that racism was following the Macpherson Inquiry into the killing of Stephen Lawrence.

Tory MP Sir Bob Neill told BBC Radio 4’s The World At One: ‘One of the things that was good after Macpherson was that it was recognised in due course that racism ought to be regarded as a particularly aggravating feature.

‘We have made racially motivated offences a hate crime. I think there is a case now for looking at misogyny.’

Women have said that the new advice piles more pressure on them – rather than tackling violent men – with some saying that it ‘grossly insulting’ with the Met accused of releasing a guide to ‘what they believe Sarah should have done’. 

Comedian Sooz Kempner said: ‘It’s deeply insulting to Sarah’s memory, her family and to women everywhere to now have ‘in future, ladies, here’s what you can do that Sarah failed to do to’ spouted at us when taking some form of action against the man nicknamed ‘the rapist’ by colleagues was always an option’.

She added: ‘Waving down a bus when you’re not even at a bus stop is a complete impossibility anyway, they don’t stop, you’d be lucky to get a second glance from the driver. And I dunno if you’ve heard but buses aren’t just constantly driving down every single road 24/7’.

Labour MP Bell Ribeiro-Addy said: ‘We want to know what the Met are doing to address the deeply rooted problems with violence against women within the force. This completely derisory advice shows they’re still not taking it seriously. And they wonder why trust is at an all-time low?’ 

Left-wing commentator Ash Sarkar said: ‘Wayne Couzens was nicknamed ‘The Rapist’, shared racist and misogynistic messages with colleagues, and committed indecent in a car registered to him 72 hours before murdering someone. But it’s Sarah Everard who should’ve waved down a bus’.

Writer Oriane Messina said: ‘Don’t go out alone at night. Don’t wear short dresses. Don’t trust an officer on his own. Don’t talk to strangers. Don’t draw attention to yourself. Don’t drink too much. Don’t be flashy. Don’t be too weak looking. HANG ON…. How about telling men don’t rape and murder women’. 

Lord Justice Fulford said his decision to hand Couzens, 48, a whole-life tariff was significantly influenced by the way he had exploited his role as a police officer, a fact he said made the offence equal in seriousness to a murder carried out by a terrorist. 

The force has announced that 650 new officers will be deployed in public places to better protect women and girls in the wake of Miss Everard’s murder.

After stinging criticism over its handling of the case, the force vowed to increase patrols and publish a new strategy for tackling violence against women.

The strategy will outline how the Met will prioritise action against sexual and violent predatory offenders.

The force said it had also set up ‘predatory offender units’, which have arrested more than 2,000 suspects for domestic abuse, sex offences, and child abuse since November.

The 650 new officers will be sent into busy public places, including areas where women and girls ‘lack confidence that they are safe’, the Met said. The force will ‘step up’ patrols and provide an increased police presence in areas identified as hotspot locations for violence and harassment.

A Met Police spokesman said: ‘The full horrific details of [Wayne Couzens’] crimes are deeply concerning and raise entirely legitimate questions. This is the most horrific of crimes, but we recognise this is part of a much bigger and troubling picture.’

The spokesman said other recent murders ‘bring into sharp focus our urgent duty to do more to protect women and girls’.   

Charity Rape Crisis warned ‘women cannot keep themselves safe’ and blasted ‘a culture that trivialises and condones rape and sexual violence’ as well as saying the justice system was ‘systematically flawed’.

And it said women who ‘do not stick to the arbitary and ineffective rulebook’ deserved to be treated with respect as victims of crime and to enjoy the same freedoms as men – such as walking in a park at night.

It pointed to rape jokes going unchallenged, the expectation that men in the workplace behave decisively, the ‘entitled’ attitude of men who expect sexual interactions, and it suggested the murders of white women are given preferential treatment in the press.

Sandy Brindley, chief executive of Rape Crisis Scotland, wrote: ‘The visceral grief so many of us felt after the murder of Sarah Everard in March was real.

‘The horrific details that have emerged this week at the sentencing of her murderer – not even two weeks after the tragic death of Sabina Nessa – have compounded this pain and brought into sharp reality that the fear we are raised to feel, though far from healthy, is legitimate.

‘From an early age, we teach girls and women that our safety in public spaces is not something that we can or should count on, and it is our responsibility to keep ourselves safe from an ever-present threat.

‘We are spoon-fed ‘solutions’ of holding keys between our fingers and sticking to the lit side of the path.

‘We rarely stop to consider that, in telling girls and women we can prevent violence, what we are really doing is falsely telling those who experience such harm that they could or should have done something differently’.

Wayne Couzens exchanged misogynistic, racist and homophobic texts with his police colleagues who are now facing a criminal investigation, it has been claimed.

Five serving officers, three of whom work for the Metropolitan Police, and one former officer, allegedly shared horrific content with Sarah Everard’s killer on a WhatsApp group in the months before the murder.

After his arrest in March, detectives found the ‘vile’ texts on his phone which the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IOPC) said were of a ‘discriminatory and/or inappropriate nature’.

Aside from the three serving officers working for the Met, one under investigation is from the Civil Nuclear Constabulary and another works for Norfolk Constabulary, according to The Times.

The former officer in the group also previously worked for the Met, whose chief Dame Cressida Dick is yet again facing calls to resign.

When Sue Fish, a former chief constable of Nottinghamshire, was asked on Times Radio if she believed the police force was institutionally misogynistic, she replied: ‘Yes, I do. And that’s not just the Metropolitan Police, that’s policing, structurally, across the country.’

The IOPC said in a statement: ‘They are being investigated for gross misconduct for allegedly sending messages of a discriminatory and/or inappropriate nature, and for allegedly failing to challenge the messages sent by the others.

What ARE your rights if a cop stops you on the street? Ex-police chief explains key questions and actions you can take if an undercover officer tries to arrest you 

Can you ever be stopped by a lone police officer in plain clothes? 

Scotland Yard said in a statement that it is ‘unusual for a single plain clothes police officer to engage with anyone in London’, although it can happen.

They said that an lone officer could be seeking to arrest you, but if they do then you should ‘expect to see other officers arrive shortly afterwards’.

As of yesterday the Metropolitan Police announced they would not deploy plain clothes officers on their own.

Deputy Commissioner Sir Stephen House said: ‘We will not operate plain clothes officers on their own. If we do use them, they will be in pairs.’

However he said there will be ‘occasions’ where that is not possible – such as when a pair of officers are split up – and noted that off-duty officers not in uniform.

Why would you be stopped by a lone police officer?

Police only have the power to stop someone if they have reasonable grounds that you have committed a crime.

The only other time they can is if they think you might be carrying a weapon or doing anti-social behaviour.

If they do think this and they ask for your address and details, you have to answer and if you fail to do this, it could be considered a criminal offence in itself.

What should you do if no police backup arrives? 

You would expect a lone police officer who is arresting you to soon be joined by backup, although it is possible that this might not happen and you are still alone.

Scotland Yard said in this case that it was ‘entirely reasonable for you to seek further reassurance of that officer’s identity and intentions’.

The Met said it advises people to ‘ask some very searching questions of that officer’, including:

  • ‘Where are your colleagues?’
  • ‘Where have you come from?’
  • ‘Why are you here?’
  • ‘Exactly why are you stopping or talking to me?’

Former Scotland Yard senior officer Parm Sandhu told ITV’s Good Morning Britain that there were things people could do if they were concerned about an arrest.

She said that people should not get into the vehicle unless it’s a marked police vehicle and ask to see the radio, or ask the arresting officer to call their colleagues and make sure they are on duty. She added: ‘If you’re really concerned dial 999.’ 

What if you are still suspicious of the officer after questioning them?

Scotland Yard urges people to ‘seek some independent verification of what they say’.

They advise that if the police officer has a radio, ‘ask to hear the voice of the operator, even ask to speak through the radio to the operator to say who you are and for them to verify you are with a genuine officer, acting legitimately’. 

Won’t officers become annoyed if you keep asking them questions? 

Scotland Yard said: ‘All officers will, of course, know about this case and will be expecting in an interaction like that – rare as it may be – that members of the public may be understandably concerned and more distrusting than they previously would have been, and should and will expect to be asked more questions.’

What if you still feel in danger?

The Metropolitan Police said gave a series of tips for people who feel in ‘real and imminent danger and you do not believe the officer is who they say they are’.

They said it was important to ‘seek assistance’, giving the examples of ‘shouting out to a passer-by, running into a house, knocking on a door, waving a bus down or if you are in the position to do so calling 999’. 

What is a ‘stop’ and how is it different to a ‘stop and search’? 

A ‘stop’ occurs when an officer stops and asks you questions, but this is not an official stop and search and you can leave at any moment.

An individual is free to ask whether they are being detained to ascertain if it is a stop and search rather than a ‘stop and account’. If you are not being detained, you are free to leave and are not required to give your name and address.

On what grounds can an officer search you?

If an officer has reasonable ground to believe you were involve in a crime or possess a prohibited item, they can search you. 

This can only be carried out by an officer and they can only search your outer clothing. 

If they are not in uniform, they should show their identity card and you are not required to give your name and address.

If you try to resist the search, an officer can use ‘reasonable force’ and can also arrest you. 

Before the search, police should tell you their name, their police station, what they are searching for and the fact you are entitled to a copy of the search record.

What about if you are suspected of carrying drugs? 

If an officer believes you are in possession of a controlled drug, they must tell you the law they are searching you under and the reasons for the search. 

The smell of cannabis does not meet the requirements for a stop, according to the College of Policing’s authorised professional practice, but it is not legislated.

When can police search you without suspecting criminality? 

Police can carry out a search without suspicion of criminality when they are carried out under ‘non reasonable suspicion’ powers granted to an officer of at least superintendent rank.

These give police the power to carry out stop and searches without suspicion because of an increased fear of violence in an area.

These are known as Section 60 searches and can only be applied for a maximum of 48 hours.

During a search, an officer can only ask you to remove outer clothing when in public, such as a jacket, coat or gloves.

They can also put their hand in your shoes, socks and headgear and ask you to turn out your pockets. 

When can an officer perform a strip search? 

A strip search can take place inside a van or somewhere not in public such as a police tent.

It must be carried out by an officer of the same sex without an officer of the opposite sex in view, and for those aged under 17, it can only take place in the presence of an appropriate adult.

The officer must give an extra reason for the additional search, and that cannot be that nothing was found in the prior search. 

Police must fill out a form giving the reasons for a stop and search and give you a copy unless it is not possible.

If you believe it is an unlawful search or the officer was inappropriate, you should let them continue and obtain a copy of the search form, before making a complaint.

‘Two of the MPS officers and the former MPS officer have also been notified that they are being criminally investigated for improper use of the public electronic communications network under Section 127 of the Communications Act.

‘Criminal or gross misconduct investigations do not necessarily mean that charges or disciplinary proceedings will follow.’

The police watchdog is investigating the conduct of a total of 15 officers and a former officer linked to the Ms Everard case.

Asked earlier whether Couzens was a ‘bad apple’ in the police or an extreme example of an institutional problem, Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave said: ‘I’m wrestling with that myself.’

Others under investigation by the IOPC include a Scotland Yard probationer on the cordon at the scene where her body was discovered. 

He is alleged to have sent a shocking WhatsApp message showing how a policeman could abduct and kill a woman as a joke.

Two other constables on probation are also being investigated by the Independent Office for Police Conduct over allegations they shared the graphic and failed to challenge it. 

Another inquiry is underway separately into Police Federation members accused of breaching standards of professional behaviour by sharing information linked to the case on a secure messaging app.

The IOPC has said it will seek to conclude the investigations ‘as swiftly as possible’. 

Meanwhile, it has emerged that 771 Met officers and staff have faced sexual misconduct allegations since 2010, with at least 44 convicted of sexual offences.

Freedom of Information figures reveal that 163 were arrested and 83 were sacked without notice.

Of those arrested, 78 were charged and 44 convicted. 

At least 18 were jailed and nine were given suspended jail sentences. 

The allegations included rape, sexual harassment, sexual assault and abusing a position of power for sex.

Some 89 per cent of officers and staff members who faced an internal investigation over complaints were male. Formal action was taken in 156 cases. 

As well as the sackings, 46 people retired or resigned once the complaint against them was upheld.

Of the sexual misconduct claims, it was found that there was no case to answer or the allegation was unsubstantiated on 446 occasions.

The force is Britain’s largest, with 43,000 officers and staff. 

It has 25 per cent of the total police budget for England and Wales.

A Scotland Yard spokesman said last night: ‘We take any police-perpetrated abuse incidents extremely seriously and they are regularly scrutinised at a senior level.

‘Any allegation, disclosure or conviction of sexual harassment or abuse perpetrated by an officer or member of staff is robustly investigated.’

He stressed: ‘Tackling sexual offences is a priority for the Met – and that includes when our own officers or staff are accused of offences. 

‘The Met will not hesitate to bring forward prosecutions and disciplinary procedures where there is evidence to do so.’

Police forces across the country will have to work ‘much harder’ to win back public trust after the murder of Sarah Everard by a serving Met officer, a minister has said.

Policing minister Kit Malthouse said the case had struck a ‘devastating blow to the confidence that people have in police officers’, and he warned thousands of officers will need to do more so trust can be rebuilt.

Wayne Couzens was handed a whole life sentence on Thursday for the kidnap, rape and murder of the 33-year-old marketing executive, meaning he will never be freed from jail.

The Met has vowed to make the streets safer for women and girls as it said it is investigating whether Couzens committed more crimes before killing Ms Everard.

The force said it will no longer deploy plain clothes officers on their own after the Old Bailey heard Couzens had used lockdown rules and shown his warrant card to falsely arrest Ms Everard during the abduction.

The force advised anyone who is concerned a police officer is not acting legitimately during an interaction to ask where the officer’s colleagues are; where they have come from; why they are there; and exactly why they are stopping or talking to them.

Anyone could verify the police officer by asking to hear their radio operator or asking to speak to the radio operator themselves, the force said, also suggesting suggested people who are concerned can shout out to a passer-by, run into a house, knock on a door, wave a bus down, or call 999.

It plans to send 650 new officers into busy public places and promised to ‘step up’ patrols in areas identified as ‘hotspot’ locations for violence and harassment.

Speaking on Sky News on Friday, Mr Malthouse said: ‘They recognise that this has struck a devastating blow to the confidence that people have in police officers but also in the Met Police in particular.

‘For those thousands and thousands of police officers out there who will have to work harder – much harder – to win public trust, it is a very, very difficult time.’

Mr Malthouse said there are important lessons to learn from what happened.

‘My job is effectively to help the Home Secretary hold the police to account about what went wrong, how this monster slipped through the net to become a police officer, how we can make sure it doesn’t happen again,’ he said.

But he joined several other politicians and policing figures in rejecting mounting calls for Met Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick to resign, adding: ‘She is a dedicated and talented and committed police officer who is driving the Metropolitan Police to ever greater standards of care and improvement and fighting crime.’

The Met is facing questions as to how Couzens was able to get a job with the force despite allegations made against him earlier in his career – prompting a wider debate over whether police vetting rules are strict enough.

Mr Malthouse told BBC Breakfast: ‘One of the lessons that we will need to learn is the allegations that were made against him – where those investigations led to, why they did not pop up on his vetting or have any impact in his employment with the Metropolitan Police.

‘That is currently under investigation.’

Jess Phillips, Labour’s shadow minister for domestic violence and safeguarding, said trust in police is ‘not going to be built back overnight’, telling BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘It is going to be built up if we see the Government and police forces starting to actually take violence against women and girls, and the complaints that women make day in, day out, seriously.’

It comes as Met chief Cressida Dick faces a clamour to resign after she admitted Sarah Everard’s murder had corroded trust in the police and brought ‘shame’ on her force.

In what was described as Scotland Yard’s ‘darkest day’, a string of MPs, including the chairman of the women and equalities select committee, said Dame Cressida should go.

They said it was clear she could not restore faith in Britain’s biggest police force after one of her officers, Wayne Couzens, was sentenced to a whole-life term for Miss Everard’s murder. 

Home Secretary Priti Patel said the force had ‘serious questions to answer’ – and refused to give the beleaguered Met Commissioner her public backing.

Following women too closely in the street should be a CRIMINAL offence, says MP Harriet Harman 

Ex-Labour deputy leader Harriet Harman has called for kerb crawlers to lose their driving licences and said following women too closely in the street should become a crime. 

In an interview with Good Morning Britain, the MP said that even girls walking home from school were being ‘hassled’ by drivers and called on Met Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick to ‘bring in new criminal offences so that if a man kerb crawls a girl walking home in the dark in his car – that’s a criminal offence and he gets his license taken away.’ 

Speaking to GMB this morning, Ms Harman said: ‘if he [a man] follows a woman walking too closely behind her in the street, asking her out, asking for her number, asking why she is not answering him, that that is harassment and it’s a criminal offence.’

She added: ‘Even schoolgirls walking home at night get followed and hassled. It ought to be a criminal offence. If you kerb crawl a woman in the street, you should get your driving licence taken away.

‘Men would pretty soon not do that, if they knew that they would lose their driving licence.’ 

As it was revealed police may have had enough information to identify Couzens as a sexual deviant before he raped and killed Miss Everard, Dame Cressida gave a humbled apology on the steps of the Old Bailey.

But as she apologised on behalf of the force, the Yard chief was heckled by protesters shouting ‘resign’. 

Miss Everard’s family said the world was a ‘safer place’ after 48-year-old Couzens was sentenced to die in prison, with the judge saying his ‘warped, selfish and brutal offending’ had ‘eroded’ confidence in British policing.

The case has triggered immense public and political outrage after it emerged Couzens abused police powers to ‘arrest’ and abduct the 33-year-old marketing executive. 

Officers did not check his vehicle records, which would have revealed a link to an indecent exposure in Kent in 2015 when Couzens was reported by a male motorist for driving around naked from the waist down.

Despite this failure, Met Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave provoked astonishment when he said Couzens would still have got into the force even if vetting officers had known, because Kent Police failed to identify Couzens – then one of their own special constables – as the driver and decided it did not merit any further action.

In another missed opportunity, 72 hours before the murder, staff at a drive-through McDonald’s restaurant in Swanley told police that two female staff members had been flashed by a motorist who exposed himself on February 7 and again on February 27.

But despite being given CCTV evidence and the number plate of Couzens’ car, detectives did not link the two incidents to the killer officer.

Had he been identified as a suspected sex offender, Couzens is likely to have been suspended and had his warrant card removed.

Mr Ephgrave said he didn’t know whether Miss Everard’s murder could have been prevented if vetting checks had been carried out properly , saying: ‘If any of those things had been in a different order, would the outcome have been different? Well maybe.’

The deaths of Sarah and Sabina Nessa has led to an outpouring of grief and anger in Britain

The deaths of Sarah and Sabina Nessa has led to an outpouring of grief and anger in Britain

Mr Ephgrave admitted trust in the police had been seriously damaged, adding: ‘One of my daughters said to me, ‘Dad, what am I supposed to do if I get stopped (by a policeman) coming home?’ 

It is understood that Dame Cressida will be called in by the Home Secretary following next week’s Tory party conference to discuss the issue.

Meanwhile, detectives from the Met Police are actively investigating if Couzens is connected to any further historic crimes.

Officers this evening appealed for any so-far unknown victims of the sexual predator to contact them if they were targeted by him.

The Met action emerged hours after criminologists told MailOnline his crime suggested ‘he had done this before’.

A Scotland Yard spokesman said: ‘As you would expect we continue to make enquiries to establish whether he has been involved in other criminal offences. As these investigations are ongoing we are unable to go into further detail although, at this time, we have not identified anything that is of the same level of seriousness as the crimes he has been sentenced for.

‘We are keen to hear from anyone who may have information about any criminality they believe Couzens was involved in.’  

Professor David Wilson

Dr David Holmes

Criminologists Professor David Wilson and Dr David Holmes both say it is unlikely that this is Couzens first major crime

CCTV footage (pictured) captured by a passing bus showed Miss Everard in the back seat of Couzens' hire car after she was falsely 'arrested'

CCTV footage (pictured) captured by a passing bus showed Miss Everard in the back seat of Couzens’ hire car after she was falsely ‘arrested’

The deranged Met Protection Officer, who was wearing his police belt containing handcuffs, can be seen producing his warrant card as he claimed Miss Everard had breached Covid restrictions

The deranged Met Protection Officer, who was wearing his police belt containing handcuffs, can be seen producing his warrant card as he claimed Miss Everard had breached Covid restrictions

The killer rapist, 48, who staged a fake arrest as a ploy to trap Ms Everard in the back of his car, was this morning sentenced to a whole life order for his barbaric crimes.

But experts say the confidence in which he carried out the abduction shows he had done it before. And the way he disposed of Miss Everard’s body by burning her remains signalled ‘experienced behaviour’. 

The killer cop was nicknamed The Rapist because of his inappropriate behaviour around women, had an obsession with ‘brutal porn’ and flashed McDonald’s workers before murdering Sarah Everard on March 3. 

But he still passed a vetting process that saw him put in charge of a gun as he stood guard at embassies in London for Met Police. 

The IOPC is also looking into Kent Police – where Couzens used to work as a volunteer – after it was accused of not investigating reports in 2015 that a man had been spotted driving down a road with no trousers on. 

Met Police admitted ‘one of a range of checks’ when Couzens applied to join the force ‘may not have been undertaken correctly’.

Couzens’ car numberplate was linked to the 2015 indecent exposure but Met Police blamed the Kent force, claiming ‘Kent Police investigated this allegation and decided to take no further action. Our review found that the record of this allegation and outcome may not have been found during the vetting checks.’

It comes as a list of eight blunders that left Couzens free to kill were revealed.  

Couzens' car is seen driving along Cavendish Road at 9.32pm, just minutes before he pulled over and stopped Miss Everard

Couzens’ car is seen driving along Cavendish Road at 9.32pm, just minutes before he pulled over and stopped Miss Everard 

Miss Everard was taken out of the hire car and forced into Couzens' own car (pictured) in a switch made at 11.30pm on North Military Road in Dover, Kent

Miss Everard was taken out of the hire car and forced into Couzens’ own car (pictured) in a switch made at 11.30pm on North Military Road in Dover, Kent

How events in the Sarah Everard case unfolded

  • 2015: Kent Police allegedly fail to investigate an indecent exposure incident linked to Wayne Couzens.
  • September 2018: Couzens transfers to the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), from the Civil Nuclear Constabulary (CNC).
  • 2019: Couzens and his wife buy a small area of woodland off Fridd Lane in Ashford, Kent.
  • February 2019: The Pc joins a response team covering the Bromley area of south London, having initially served in a Safer Neighbourhood Team.
  • February 2020: He moves to the Parliamentary and Diplomatic Protection Command to patrol diplomatic premises, mainly embassies.
  • February 2021: The 48-year-old is linked to two allegations of indecent exposure in London, which it is claimed Scotland Yard failed to investigate.
  • February 28: Couzens books a white Vauxhall Astra from a car hire firm in Dover, Kent, using his personal details and bank card. He also purchases a roll of self-adhesive film advertised as a carpet protector on Amazon.
  • March 2: 7pm – Couzens starts a 12-hour shift at his base in West Brompton, west London.
  • March 3: On the day of her disappearance, Sarah Everard visits a friend in the Clapham Junction area and uses her bank card to buy a bottle of wine in Sainsbury’s in Brixton Hill, south London, on her way.
  • 4.45pm – Couzens collects the hire car.
  • 9pm – Ms Everard leaves to walk home, some 2.5 miles away.
  • 9.13pm – She calls her boyfriend for a little over 14 minutes.
  • 9.15pm – Ms Everard is captured alone on CCTV at the junction of Bowood Road and the South Circular.
  • 9.28pm – The next sighting is on Cavendish Road and she is still alone.
  • 9.32pm – Ms Everard is caught on the camera on a marked police car.
  • 9.35pm – A bus camera captures two figures on Poynders Road standing beside a white Vauxhall Astra parked on the pavement with hazard lights flashing.
  • 9.38pm – Another bus camera captures the same vehicle with the two front car doors open.
  • – March 4: 1am – Having travelled out of London, the car is in the Tilmanstone area of Kent.
  • 8.30am – Couzens returns the hire car used in the abduction.
  • 8.10pm – Ms Everard is reported missing by her boyfriend, Josh Lowth.
  • March 5: The case is escalated and the Specialist Crime Unit becomes involved. Couzens, who is due to be off until March 8, reports to work that he is suffering with stress.
  • 2pm – He buys two green rubble bags for £9.94 at B&Q in Dover.
  • March 6: Couzens emails his supervisor that he no longer wants to carry a firearm. He orders a tarpaulin and a bungee cargo net on Amazon which are shipped to him the next day.
  • March 8: The officer reports in sick on the day he is due to return to work.
  • March 9: 7.11pm – Couzens’ phone is wiped of all data.
  • 7.50pm – Couzens is arrested at his home in Deal, Kent. In a brief interview, he tells a story about being threatened by an Eastern European gang.
  • March 10: At around 4.45pm, a body is discovered in a wooded area in Ashford, Kent, and later formally identified by dental records. It is around 100 metres from land owned by Couzens.
  • March 11: Couzens answers “no comment” in formal interviews.
  • March 12: 8.45pm: Couzens is charged.
  • July 9: Couzens pleads guilty to murder when he appears at the Old Bailey by video link from Belmarsh high security jail. 
  • September 29: Couzens faces a possible whole life order when he is sentenced.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk