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Man arrested ‘smuggling rare and expensive fish into Australia by strapping it around his neck’

Vietnamese man is arrested at the airport after ‘trying to smuggle a rare and expensive fish into Australia by strapping it to his neck’

  • Vietnamese national has been caught trying to smuggle rare fish into Australia 
  • Border Force found the 34-year-old had the fish in a bag strapped to his neck 
  • He was granted bail to appear before Adelaide Magistrates Court on May 15 

A man who allegedly tried to smuggled a rare and expensive fish into Australia by strapping it around his neck has been arrested by Australian Border Force officers. 

The Vietnamese national, 34, was selected for baggage examination after arriving at Adelaide airport from a Malaysian flight. 

When officers began a frisk search of the man he allegedly produced the bag containing the fish. 

The fish was identified as an endangered Fully Red Asian Arowana by the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources. 

A man who allegedly tried to smuggled a rare and expensive fish into Australia by strapping it around his neck has been arrested by Australian Border Force officers 

The trade of this species is controlled under the international Convention in Trade of Endangered Species, to which Australia is a signatory.

 Southeast Asia and are popular pets due to the vibrant colours of the different varieties also including the Silver Asian, Blue Malayan, and Gold Crossback. 

ABF officers arrested the man and he was subsequently granted bail to appear before the Magistrates Court on May 15. 

The maximum penalty for wildlife trade offences under Australian law is 10 years’ imprisonment and a fine of up to $210,000 for individuals or up to $1,050,000 for corporations.

ABF Chief Superintendent, Regional Command SA, Brett Liebich said the ABF will do everything in its power to disrupt and deter the illegal trade of animals.

‘The ABF takes the illegal wildlife trade seriously and we will continue to work collaboratively with our partners to detect, disrupt and deter illegal activity at our borders,’ he said on Sunday. 

The trade of this species is controlled under the international Convention in Trade of Endangered Species, to which Australia is a signatory

The trade of this species is controlled under the international Convention in Trade of Endangered Species, to which Australia is a signatory 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk